Te Kaunihera o Tai Tokerau ki te Raki

 

 

AGENDA

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

Thursday, 29 October 2020

Time:

10.00 am

Location:

Council Chamber

Memorial Avenue

Kaikohe

 

 

Membership:

Mayor John Carter - Chairperson

Deputy Mayor Ann Court

Cr David Clendon

Cr Dave Collard

Cr Felicity Foy

Cr Mate Radich

Cr Rachel Smith

Cr Kelly Stratford

Cr Moko Tepania

Cr John Vujcich

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

COUNCIL MEMBERS REGISTER OF INTERESTS

Name

Responsibility (i.e. Chairperson etc)

Declaration of Interests

Nature of Potential Interest

Member's Proposed Management Plan

Hon Mayor John Carter QSO

Board Member of the Local Government Protection Programme

Board Member of the Local Government Protection Program

 

 

Carter Family Trust

 

 

 

Deputy Mayor Ann Court

Waipapa Business Association

Member

 

Case by case

Warren Pattinson Limited

Shareholder

Building company. FNDC is a regulator and enforcer

Case by case

Kerikeri Irrigation

Supplies my water

 

No

Top Energy

Supplies my power

 

No other interest greater than the publics

District Licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

Top Energy Consumer Trust

Trustee

Crossover in regulatory functions, consenting economic development and contracts such as street lighting.

Declare interest and abstain from voting.

Ann Court Trust

Private

Private

N/A

Waipapa Rotary

Honorary member

Potential community funding submitter

Declare interest and abstain from voting.

Properties on Onekura Road, Waipapa

Owner Shareholder

Any proposed FNDC Capital works or policy change which may have a direct impact (positive/adverse)

Declare interest and abstain from voting.

Property on Daroux Dr, Waipapa

Financial interest

Any proposed FNDC Capital works or policy change which may have a direct impact (positive/adverse)

Declare interest and abstain from voting.

Flowers and gifts

Ratepayer 'Thankyou'

Bias/ Pre-determination?

Declare to Governance

Coffee and food

Ratepayers sometimes 'shout' food and beverage

Bias or pre-determination

Case by case

Staff

N/A

Suggestion of not being impartial or pre-determined!

Be professional, due diligence, weigh the evidence. Be thorough, thoughtful, considered impartial and balanced. Be fair.

Warren Pattinson

My husband is a builder and may do work for Council staff

 

Case by case

Ann Court - Partner

Warren Pattinson Limited

Director

Building Company. FNDC is a regulator

Remain at arm’s length

Air NZ

Shareholder

None

None

Warren Pattinson Limited

Builder

FNDC is the consent authority, regulator and enforcer.

Apply arm’s length rules

Property on Onekura Road, Waipapa

Owner

Any proposed FNDC capital work in the vicinity or rural plan change. Maybe a link to policy development.

Would not submit.                                                                               Rest on a case by case basis.

David Clendon

Chairperson – He Waka Eke Noa Charitable Trust

None

 

Declare if any issue arises

Member of Vision Kerikeri

None

 

Declare if any issue arrises

Joint owner of family home in Kerikeri

Hall Road, Kerikeri

 

 

David Clendon – Partner

Resident Shareholder on Kerikeri Irrigation

 

 

 

David Collard

Snapper Bonanza 2011 Limited

45% Shareholder and Director

 

 

Trustee of Te Ahu Charitable Trust

Council delegate to this board

 

 

Felicity Foy

Director - Northland Planning & Development

I am the director of a planning and development consultancy that is based in the Far North and have two employees.

Property owner of Commerce Street, Kaitaia

 

I will abstain from any debate and voting on proposed plan change items for the Far North District Plan.

 

 

 

I will declare a conflict of interest with any planning matters that relate to resource consent processing, and the management of the resource consents planning team.

 

 

 

I will not enter into any contracts with Council for over $25,000 per year. I have previously contracted to Council to process resource consents as consultant planner.

Flick Trustee Ltd

I am the director of this company that is the company trustee of Flick Family Trust that owns properties Seaview Road – Cable Bay, and Allen Bell Drive - Kaitaia.

 

 

Elbury Holdings Limited

This company is directed by my parents Fiona and Kevin King.

This company owns several dairy and beef farms, and also dwellings on these farms. The Farms and dwellings are located in the Far North at Kaimaumau, Bird Road/Sandhills Rd, Wireless Road/ Puckey Road/Bell Road, the Awanui Straight and Allen Bell Drive.

 

Foy Farms Partnership

Owner and partner in Foy Farms - a farm on Church Road, Kaingaroa

 

 

Foy Farms Rentals

Owner and rental manager of Foy Farms Rentals for 7 dwellings on Church Road, Kaingaroa and 2 dwellings on Allen Bell Drive, Kaitaia, and 1 property on North Road, Kaitaia, one title contains a cell phone tower.

 

 

King Family Trust

This trust owns several titles/properties at Cable Bay, Seaview Rd/State Highway 10 and Ahipara - Panorama Lane.

These trusts own properties in the Far North.

 

Previous employment at FNDC 2007-16

I consider the staff members at FNDC to be my friends

 

 

Shareholder of Coastal Plumbing NZ Limited

 

 

 

Felicity Foy - Partner

Director of Coastal Plumbing NZ Limited

 

 

 

Friends with some FNDC employees

 

 

 

Mate Radich

No form received

 

 

 

Rachel Smith

Friends of Rolands Wood Charitable Trust

Trustee

 

 

Mid North Family Support

Trustee

 

 

Property Owner

Kerikeri

 

 

Friends who work at Far North District Council

 

 

 

Kerikeri Cruising Club

Subscription Member

 

 

Rachel Smith (Partner)

Property Owner

Kerikeri

 

 

Friends who work at Far North District Council

 

 

 

Kerikeri Cruising Club

Subscription Member and Treasurer

 

 

Kelly Stratford

KS Bookkeeping and Administration

Business Owner, provides book keeping, administration and development of environmental management plans

None perceived

Step aside from decisions that arise, that may have conflicts

Waikare Marae Trustees

Trustee

Maybe perceived conflicts

Case by case basis

Bay of Islands College

Parent Elected Trustee

None perceived

If there was a conflict, I will step aside from decision making

Karetu School

Parent Elected Trustee

None perceived

If there was a conflict, I will step aside from decision making

Māori title land – Moerewa and Waikare

Beneficiary and husband is a shareholder

None perceived

If there was a conflict, I will step aside from decision making

Sister is employed by Far North District Council

 

 

Will not discuss work/governance mattes that are confidential

Gifts - food and beverages

Residents and ratepayers may ‘shout’ food and beverage

Perceived bias or predetermination

Case by case basis

Taumarere Counselling Services

Advisory Board Member

May be perceived conflicts

Should conflict arise, step aside from voting

Sport Northland

Board Member

May be perceived conflicts

Should conflict arise, step aside from voting

Kelly Stratford - Partner

Chef and Barista

Opua Store

None perceived

 

Māori title land – Moerewa

Shareholder

None perceived

If there was a conflict of interest I would step aside from decision making

Moko Tepania

Teacher

Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Kaikohe.

Potential Council funding that will benefit my place of employment.

Declare a perceived conflict

Chairperson

Te Reo o Te Tai Tokerau Trust.

Potential Council funding for events that this trust runs.

Declare a perceived conflict

Tribal Member

Te Rūnanga o Te Rarawa

As a descendent of Te Rarawa I could have a perceived conflict of interest in Te Rarawa Council relations.

Declare a perceived conflict

Tribal Member

Te Rūnanga o Whaingaroa

As a descendent of Te Rūnanga o Whaingaroa I could have a perceived conflict of interest in Te Rūnanga o Whaingaroa Council relations.

Declare a perceived conflict

Tribal Member

Kahukuraariki Trust Board

As a descendent of Kahukuraariki Trust Board I could have a perceived conflict of interest in Kahukuraariki Trust Board Council relations.

Declare a perceived conflict

Tribal Member

Te Rūnanga ā-Iwi o Ngāpuhi

As a descendent of Te Rūnanga ā-Iwi o Ngāpuhi I could have a perceived conflict of interest in Te Rūnanga ā-Iwi o Ngāpuhi Council relations.

Declare a perceived conflict

John Vujcich

Board Member

Pioneer Village

Matters relating to funding and assets

Declare interest and abstain

Director

Waitukupata Forest Ltd

Potential for council activity to directly affect its assets

Declare interest and abstain

Director

Rural Service Solutions Ltd

Matters where council regulatory function impact of company services

Declare interest and abstain

Director

Kaikohe (Rau Marama) Community Trust

Potential funder

Declare interest and abstain

Partner

MJ & EMJ Vujcich

Matters where council regulatory function impacts on partnership owned assets

Declare interest and abstain

Member

Kaikohe Rotary Club

Potential funder, or impact on Rotary projects

Declare interest and abstain

Member

New Zealand Institute of Directors

Potential provider of training to Council

Declare a Conflict of Interest

Member

Institute of IT Professionals

Unlikely, but possible provider of services to Council

Declare a Conflict of Interest

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

Far North District Council

Ordinary Council Meeting

will be held in the Council Chamber, Memorial Avenue, Kaikohe on:

Thursday 29 October 2020 at 10.00 am

Order Of Business

1         Karakia Timatanga – Opening Prayer 11

2         Apologies and Declarations of Interest 11

3         Deputation. 11

4         Mayoral Announcements. 11

5         Confirmation of Previous Minutes. 12

5.1            Confirmation of Previous Minutes. 12

6         Reports. 28

6.1            Lease 8 Melba Street, Kaitaia to Nga Wawata Bi-Lingual Early Childhood Centre Ltd. 28

6.2            Speed Limit Bylaw - Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North Review Area. 31

6.3            Māori Elected Members on Council 69

6.4            Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party. 79

6.5            Re-Affirm Approval Of Unbudgeted Funds for Drought Resilience Work in 2020/2021. 105

6.6            Setting of 2021 Meeting schedule. 118

6.7            Formal Appointments of Councillors. 125

7         Information Reports. 128

7.1            CEO Report to Council 01 July 2020 - 31 August 2020. 128

8         Public Excluded. 192

8.1            Confirmation of Previous Minutes - Public Excluded. 192

8.2            Kaitaia Regeneration - Proposed Land Purchase. 192

9         Karakia Whakamutunga – Closing Prayer 193

10       Meeting Close. 193

 

 


1          Karakia Timatanga – Opening Prayer

2          Apologies and Declarations of Interest

Members need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a Member of the Council and any private or other external interest they might have. This note is provided as a reminder to Members to review the matters on the agenda and assess and identify where they may have a pecuniary or other conflict of interest, or where there may be a perception of a conflict of interest.

If a Member feels they do have a conflict of interest, they should publicly declare that at the start of the meeting or of the relevant item of business and refrain from participating in the discussion or voting on that item. If a Member thinks they may have a conflict of interest, they can seek advice from the Chief Executive Officer or the Team Leader Democracy Support (preferably before the meeting).

It is noted that while members can seek advice the final decision as to whether a conflict exists rests with the member.

3          Deputation

10:10am - Villa Education Trust Alwyn Poole - Rain harvesting project for Russell as a test case

10:20am - Far North Waters Alliance – Introduction to new manager Guillaume de Rouvroy

10:30am - Focus Paihia - Introduction and overview of direction

 

4          Mayoral Announcements    

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

5          Confirmation of Previous Minutes

5.1         Confirmation of Previous Minutes

File Number:           A2968054

Author:                    Casey Gannon, Meetings Administrator

Authoriser:              Aisha Huriwai, Team Leader Democracy Services

 

Purpose of the Report

The minutes are attached to allow Council to confirm that the minutes are a true and correct record of previous meetings.

Recommendation

That Council confirms the minutes of the Council meeting held 24 September 2020 as a true and correct record.

 

 

1) Background

Local Government Act 2002 Schedule 7 Section 28 states that a local authority must keep minutes of its proceedings.  The minutes of these proceedings duly entered and authenticated as prescribed by a local authority are prima facie evidence of those meetings.

2) Discussion and Options

The minutes of the meetings are attached.

Far North District Council Standing Orders Section 27.3 states that no discussion shall arise on the substance of the minutes in any succeeding meeting, except as to their correctness.

Reason for the recommendation

The reason for the recommendation is to confirm the minutes are a true and correct record of the previous meetings.

3) Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

There are no financial implications or the need for budgetary provision as a result of this report.

Attachments

1.      2020-09-24 Council Minutes [A2958339] - A2958339  


 

Compliance schedule:

Full consideration has been given to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 S77 in relation to decision making, in particular:

1.      A Local authority must, in the course of the decision-making process,

a)      Seek to identify all reasonably practicable options for the achievement of the objective of a decision; and

b)      Assess the options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

c)       If any of the options identified under paragraph (a) involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

2.      This section is subject to Section 79 - Compliance with procedures in relation to decisions.

 

Compliance requirement

Staff assessment

State the level of significance (high or low) of the issue or proposal as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

This is a matter of low significance.

State the relevant Council policies (external or internal), legislation, and/or community outcomes (as stated in the LTP) that relate to this decision.

This report complies with the Local Government Act 2002 Schedule 7 Section 28.

State whether this issue or proposal has a District wide relevance and, if not, the ways in which the appropriate Community Board’s views have been sought.

It is the responsibility of each meeting to confirm their minutes therefore the views of another meeting are not relevant.

State the possible implications for Māori and how Māori have been provided with an opportunity to contribute to decision making if this decision is significant and relates to land and/or any body of water.

There are no implications for Māori in confirming minutes from a previous meeting. Any implications on Māori arising from matters included in meeting minutes should be considered as part of the relevant report.

Identify persons likely to be affected by or have an interest in the matter, and how you have given consideration to their views or preferences (for example, youth, the aged and those with disabilities).

This report is asking for minutes to be confirmed as true and correct record, any interests that affect other people should be considered as part of the individual reports.

State the financial implications and where budgetary provisions have been made to support this decision.

There are no financial implications or the need for budgetary provision arising from this report.

Chief Financial Officer review.

The Chief Financial Officer has not reviewed this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

   MINUTES OF Far North District Council
Ordinary Council Meeting
HELD AT THE
Council Chamber, Memorial Avenue, Kaikohe
ON
Thursday, 24 September 2020 AT 10.00 am

 

PRESENT:               Mayor John Carter (HWTM), Deputy Mayor Ann Court, Cr David Clendon, Cr Dave Collard, Cr Felicity Foy, Cr Mate Radich, Cr Kelly Stratford, Cr Rachel Smith, Cr Moko Tepania, Cr John Vujcich

IN ATTENDANCE: Adele Gardner (Te Hiku Community Board Chairperson), Belinda Ward (Bay of Islands-Whangaroa Community Board), Shaun Clarke (Chief Executive Officer), Andy Finch (General Manager Infrastructure and Asset Management), Dean Myburgh (General Manager District Services), William J Taylor, MBE (General Manager Corporate Services), Darrell Sargent (General Manager Strategic Planning and Policy)

1          Karakia Timatanga – Opening Prayer

His Worship the Mayor commenced the meeting and;

·     Acknowledged Cr Tepania who will be speaking in Te Reo Māori for the duration of the meeting and welcomes Nia Kara who is providing the English translation on his behalf.

·     Invited Cr Foy to recite the Council prayer.

·     Acknowledged the attendance of David Webb and Wendy Edwards, formerly of Broadspectrum (now Ventia). David Webb was presented with a gift for his commitment to working with the Far North District Council during the drought and COVID-19, away from his family in Christchurch.

·     Acknowledges birthday celebrations during the months of August and September for Crs Felicity Foy, Ann Court, Rachel Smith, Moko Tepania, and David Clendon.

2          Apologies and Declarations of Interest

Apologies

Resolution  2020/52

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Kelly Stratford

That an apology be received for Kaikohe-Hokianga Community Board Chair Mike Edmonds be received and a leave of absence granted.

Carried

3            MAYORAL ANNOUNCEMENTS   

•      Hundertwasser Program is making progress.

•      Sister Cities Program: on hold until COVID-19 lockdown has ended.

•      Regional Economic Development Working Party.

•      Rangitane Jetty and Boat ramp issues being worked through with all parties.

•      Windsor Landing issues being worked through with the help of Nora Rameka and others.

•      Three Waters and Local Government reform issues are ongoing.

•      Northland Adventure Experience Limited (NAX Ltd) will be address in the Public Excluded part of the agenda with a recommendation for Cr Tepania to be appointed.

•      Dr Dean Myburgh gave an update on Arvida.

•      Taipa Waste Water Treatment

•      Mangonui boardwalk temporary fix in place.

•      Emergency Water Supply; Staff starting to work on drought alternatives for the coming summer.

4          Deputation

Ministry of Social Development (MSD) – Eru Lyndon, Darrell Lambert;

·    Presentation on the Labour Market, Benefit Register, Investment, Wage Subsidy Insights, Wrap-around Support, Māori and What Next?

·    Will report back quarterly.

 

ĀKAU Design – Ana Heremaia – presentation on;

·    Priority 1: Bikes on Broadway

·    Priority 2: Memorial Park

·    Priority 3: Safety & Access

·    Priority 4: Broadway Upgrade

·    Priority 5: Te Pu o Te Wheke

 

Te Whakamanamai Whanau Trust – Rhonda Zielinski and Doug Healey – Te Whakamamai Trust

Presentation;

·    Seeking Partnership with FNDC on option 3. Proposed Transitional Housing site

·    Funding

·    Support & Endorsement

·    Approved Consents

·    Help us Navigate the Required Council Pathway’s

 

Kerikeri Ratepayers Association and Paihia and Districts Ratepayers Association - Jane Johnson:

·     Alarmed with fast-moving feast that’s on Council agendas at the moment with the influence of the Provincial Growth Fund, Shovel-Ready Projects as part of the Emergency Response to COVID stimulus packages and Infrastructure funds and various other things that are influencing Council at the moment.

·     Community Centre Business Case application for funding to pay rent was declined by Bay of Islands-Whangaroa Communtiy Board.

·     Housing affordability, quality and chronic social housing deficit in the Far North.

·     Unbudgeted funds for drought resistance work.

·     Are the communities receiving what they are paying for?

·     The LTP is silent on funding for the Kerikeri domain.

·     Kerikeri Domain are setting up a working party.

·     Provincial Growth Fund is complicating the consultation process.

·     The Kerikeri Ratepayers Association and Paihia and Districts Ratepayers Association request for Deputation to each Committee October meeting to discuss to go over, in detail, the reports being considered today with a veiw to engaging more closely.

·     Paihia Waterfront is fraught where the is money budgeted from the PGF.

5            Major Item not on the Agenda – Regional Economic Development Working Party Appointment

His Worship the Mayor introduced the item verbally.

Resolution  2020/53

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Moko Tepania

That Council:

a)    give consent for His Worship the Mayor to table a motion to appoint Councillors John Vujcich and David Clendon as Far North District Council representatives on the Regional Economic Development Working Party.

b)    appoints Crs John Vujcich and David Clendon as Far North District Council representatives on the Regional Economic Development Working Party.

Carried

 

The meeting was adjourned from 11:25 am to 11:33 am.

6          Confirmation of Previous Minutes

6.1         Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Agenda item 5.1 document number A2952428, pages 12 - 32 refers.

Resolution  2020/54

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Moko Tepania

That Council confirms the minutes of the Council meetings held 13 August 2020 and 25 August 2020 as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

7          Reports

7.1         Freese Park, Omapere - Erosion Issues

Agenda item 6.1 document number A2917344, pages 33 - 38 refers.

motion

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Moko Tepania

That Council approves:

a)      the requirement for unbudgeted operational expenditure of approximately $200k to appoint a consultant project manager, undertake hydraulic modelling, and community consultation to identify the optimal solution to address coastal erosion issues and thereby protect Council owned assets at Freese Park, Omapere.

That Council notes:

b)      that unbudgeted capital expenditure may be needed to address coastal erosion issues at Freese Park, Omapere.

c)      that the Resource Consent to be issued by Northland Regional Council required for this work will take approximately six to nine months to obtain.

d)      that the final cost of the work will be dependent upon the conditions associated with the Resource Consent.

e)      an external consultant will be procured to manage this project. For urgency this will be through a direct appointment.

f)       that there is no overall strategy or policy for addressing coastal erosion issues across the district.

g)      a further report will be brought to Council outlining the preferred option and confirming required capital budget.

Amendment

Moved:       Cr Felicity Foy

Seconded:  Cr Rachel Smith

b)      that a report will be brought to Council that considers purchasing new land for the park, retreat of infrastructure from the park and investigate liability and enforcement action against neighbouring properties, and further seek legal comment on the legal position relating to erosion.

Carried

The amendment became the substantive motion

Resolution  2020/55

Moved:       Cr Felicity Foy

Seconded:  Cr Rachel Smith

That Council approves:

a)      the requirement for unbudgeted operational expenditure of approximately $200k to appoint a consultant project manager, undertake hydraulic modelling, and community consultation to identify the optimal solution to address coastal erosion issues and thereby protect Council owned assets at Freese Park, Omapere.

That Council notes:

b)      that a report will be brought to Council that considers purchasing new land for the park, retreat of infrastructure from the park and investigate liability and enforcement action against neighbouring properties, and further seek legal comment on the legal position relating to erosion.

c)      that the Resource Consent to be issued by Northland Regional Council required for this work will take approximately six to nine months to obtain.

d)      that the final cost of the work will be dependent upon the conditions associated with the Resource Consent.

e)      an external consultant will be procured to manage this project. For urgency this will be through a direct appointment.

f)       that there is no overall strategy or policy for addressing coastal erosion issues across the district.

g)      a further report will be brought to Council outlining the preferred option and confirming required capital budget.

Carried

 

7.2         District Wide Housing for the Elderly

Agenda item 6.2 document number A2935558, pages 39 - 51 refers.

Motion

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr John Vujcich

That Council:

a)      agrees that the options, as presented, for the future of the Housing for the Elderly Portfolio be consulted on with the community through the 2021/2031 Long Term Plan engagement process.

b)      requests that a detailed asset condition survey of the Housing for the Elderly Portfolio be undertaken as soon as practical to ensure that information is available to help inform any decisions on the future of the portfolio.

c)      confirms that the 10-year budget for Housing for the Elderly asset renewals be retained in the 2021/31 Long Term.

 

AMENDMENT

Moved:       Cr Clendon

Seconded:  Cr Foy

That option c) be removed from the recommendation

LOST

Resolution  2020/56

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr John Vujcich

That Council:

a)      agrees that the options, as presented, for the future of the Housing for the Elderly Portfolio be consulted on with the community through the 2021/2031 Long Term Plan engagement process.

b)      requests that a detailed asset condition survey of the Housing for the Elderly Portfolio be undertaken as soon as practical to ensure that information is available to help inform any decisions on the future of the portfolio.

c)      confirms that the 10-year budget for Housing for the Elderly asset renewals be retained in the 2021/31 Long Term.

Carried

Abstained:       Cr David Clendon

 

12:15 pm His Worship the Mayor left the meeting – Deputy Mayor Court assumed the Chair.

12:17 His Worship the Mayor left the meeting returned to the meeting and resumed the Chair.

 

7.3         Kerikeri Basin Road Stopping and Transfer of Ownership

Agenda item 6.3 document number A2940982, pages 52 - 121 refers.

Resolution  2020/57

Moved:       Cr Rachel Smith

Seconded:  Deputy Mayor Ann Court

That Council:

a)      declare the two sections of road on either side of the Kerikeri Basin, that once connected to the vehicle bridge, surplus to requirements and consent to stopping both sections of road in accordance with the Public Works Act 1981 requirements; and

b)      once stopped, that the land be amalgamated with the adjoining land owned by the central government departments (Heritage New Zealand on the western bank and the Department of Conservation on the eastern bank), so the stopped road can be formally incorporated into the Basin reserve as per Section 7: Use Management of the 2007 Sustainable Development Plan for the Kororipo-Kerikeri Basin.

Carried

 

7.4         Policy on Elections Hoardings #2112 - rescind amended resolution made 13 August 2020 in relation to period of display

Agenda item 6.4 document number A2942696, pages 122 – 126 refers.

Resolution  2020/58

Moved:       Cr Moko Tepania

Seconded:  Cr John Vujcich

That Council rescind one part of the resolution related to period of display by replacing the wording “six weeks” with the wording “nine weeks” in clause 7 of the Election Hoardings Policy #2112.

Carried

Against:           Cr Kelly Stratford

 

7.5         2020 Resident Survey Results

Agenda item 7.1 document number A2950594, pages 406 - 501 refers.

Richard Edmondson (Manager – Communications) spoke to this item and introduced Michael Hooker (Director of Research at Key Research).

Resolution  2020/59

Moved:       Cr Kelly Stratford

Seconded:  Cr Rachel Smith

That the Council receive the report 2020 Resident Survey Results.

Carried

 

The meeting was adjourned for lunch from 12:55 pm to 1:27 pm.

 

 

7.6         2020-21 Seal Extension Program and Associated NZTA Business Case Update

Agenda item 6.5 document number A2941702, pages 127 - 301 refers.

Cr Foy declared a conflict for the following item and left the meeting at 1:30 pm.

 

Resolution  2020/60

Moved:       Deputy Mayor Ann Court

Seconded:  Cr Rachel Smith

That Council:

a)    notes that updated traffic count data validation has been completed for the Treatment Lengths (TLs) submitted to Waka Kotahi NZTA on Church Road (SH10 end), Koropewa Road and Otangaroa Road (SH1 end);

b)    reaffirms resolutions 2019/18, 2019/19 and 2019/20 (Council Meeting - August 29th, 2019) and approves proceeding with contract award and construction of the approved Waka Kotahi NZTA subsidised Treatment Lengths (TLs) on Church Road (SH10 end) and Koropewa Road;

Carried

Against:      Cr Mate Radich

 

Cr Felicity Foy returned to the meeting at 1:54 pm.

Resolution  2020/61

Moved:       Deputy Mayor Ann Court

Seconded:  Mayor John Carter

That Council:

c)    notes the sites identified for completion of Seal Extension Works in 2020/21;

d)    notes that the proposed Treatment Lengths (TLs) on Otangaroa Road (SH1 end) no longer meets the criteria for NZTA subsidised funding and will therefore be removed from the current Sealing Program, and;

e)    notes the FNDC Dust Matrix Priorities and challenges relating to funding the highest ranked RAMM-Section site length vs available budget;

f)     notes the list of NZTA Circular 16.04 criteria sites requires confirmation for investment of Business Cases, before they can be submitted to Waka Kotahi NZTA;

g)    approves the alternative list of Dust Strip Sealing sites using shorter, targeted ‘Treatment Length’ sections for fast-tracked design and construction late in the 2020-21 season.

Carried

 

7.7         Dust Matrix Prioritisation Tool Update

Agenda item 6.6 document number A2941013, pages 302 - 309 refers.

Resolution  2020/62

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Deputy Mayor Ann Court

That the Council notes the progress update on data validation associated with the Dust Matrix Prioritisation tool.

Carried

 

7.8         Appointment of Hearings Commissioner

Agenda item 6.8 document number A2947376, pages 310 - 315 refers.

Resolution  2020/63

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Kelly Stratford

That pursuant to Section 34A of the Resource Management Act 1991 that Far North District Council:

a)      delegates to Commissioner Rob van Voorthuysen the power to hear and determine RC 2200220 being an application by Far North Holdings Ltd to undertake works associated with a proposed barge docking facility at Opua,

b)      that Commissioner Rob van Voorthuysen be appointed to Council’s list of approved Commissioners.

Carried

Abstain:      Cr Felicity Foy

 

7.9         Capital Carry Forwards June 2020

Agenda item 6.9 document number A2948768, pages 316 – 327 refers.

Resolution  2020/64

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr John Vujcich

That the Council approve the capital budgets identified in the report “Carry Forward for Capital Programme 2019-20” totalling $27,721,391 be carried forward to the 2020-21 financial year.

Carried

 

7.10       Review of Road safety Promotion Activity Services

Agenda item 6.10 document number A2950912, pages 328 - 391 refers.

Sandi Morris (Road Safety & Traffic Planning Engineer), spoke to this item.

Resolution  2020/65

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr John Vujcich

That Council:

a)      approve the ‘collaborative model under the NTA umbrella’ as recommended by Northland Transportation Alliance for Far North District as detailed under the ‘reason for recommendation’ in the Road Safety Promotion Activity: Service Delivery Review Summary attached to the report on page 339, and;

b)      delegate to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to approve and sign the final procurement plan, and;

c)      approve compliance with national strategies and policies, specifically ‘Road to Zero’, to seek further funding assistance from Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency, for the Far North Community Road Safety Programme from July 2021.

Carried

 

7.11       Three Waters Reform Funding Draft Delivery Plan

Agenda item 6.11 document number A2955534, pages 392 - 398 refers.

Melissa Parlane (Team Leader – Infrastructure Planning), and Andy Finch (General Manager – Infrastructure and Asset Management), spoke to this item.

Resolution  2020/66

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Kelly Stratford

That Council:

a)       approves the Three Waters Reform Draft Delivery Plan at Appendix A.

b)       authorises the Chief Executive to finalise the Three Waters Reform Delivery Plan, to address feedback from Government and to obtain the approval needed to release funding.

Carried

Abstain:      Cr Felicity Foy

 

7.12       Appointment of Council Trustees to the Twin Coast Cycle Trail Trust

Agenda item 6.12 document number A2956560, pages 399 - 402 refers.

Resolution  2020/67

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Kelly Stratford

That Council:

a)      appoints Councillor John Vujcich as a Trustee and Grant Harnish as a Community Trustee to the Pou Herenga Tai Twin Coast Cycle Trail Trust.

Carried

Abstain:      Cr John Vujcich

 

7.13       Formalisation of Appointment to Te Hiku Sports Board

Agenda item 6.13 document number A2956856, pages 403 - 405 refers.

Resolution  2020/68

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Rachel Smith

That Council appoint Councillor Foy as its representative on Te Hiku Sports Hub Incorporated.

Carried

Abstain:      Cr Felicity Foy

 

7.14       Major Item not on the Agenda – Notice of Motion - Omapere-Opononi Wastewater Resource Consents

Resolution  2020/69

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr John Vujcich

That the matter of ‘Notice of Motion – Omapere-Opononi Wastewater Resource Consents’ be considered by Council as a matter for urgent consideration as provided for in Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 on the grounds that the Notice of Motion is a voluntary step to change a structured, timebound, consenting process.

Carried

 

7.15       Notice of Motion – Omapere-Opononi Wastewater Resource Consents

Supplementary agenda item 6.14 document number A2960823, pages 4-5 refers.

Resolution  2020/70

Moved:       Cr Kelly Stratford

Seconded:  Cr Moko Tepania

That Council request that The Northland Regional Council as the consenting Authority publicly notifies the renewal consent application to discharge treated wastewater from the Omapere-Opononi Wastewater Treatment Plant into the Hokianga Harbour.

 

Carried

Abstain:      Cr Ann Court and Felicity Foy

 

8          Public Excluded

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

Resolution  2020/71

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Felicity Foy

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

Deputation from FNHL CEO -Kaitaia Beautification/Regeneration Plan

s7(2)(b)(ii) - the withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s48(1)(a)(i) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

8.1 – Resolution to Permit Nia Kara and Andy Nock in Public Excluded

s7(2)(b)(ii) - the withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s48(1)(a)(i) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

8.2 - Confirmation of Previous Minutes - Public Excluded

s7(2)(a) - the withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(h) - the withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - the withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a)(i) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

8.3 - Coopers Beach Christian Youth Camp - Remission Request

s7(2)(a) - the withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s48(1)(a)(i) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

8.4 - Waima Tōpū B Trust - Incentivising Māori Economic Development Policy Application

s7(2)(a) - the withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s48(1)(a)(i) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

8.5 - Far North Holdings Ltd - Letter of Comfort

s7(2)(b)(ii) - the withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s48(1)(a)(i) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

8.7 Supplementary Report: The Status of Northland Adventure Experience Limited (NAX Ltd)

s7(2)(f)(i) - free and frank expression of opinions by or between or to members or officers or employees of any local authority

s7(2)(g) -the withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege. 

 

8.8 Item Left to Lie on the Table - Appointment of Director to the Board of Northland Adventure Experience Limited (NAX Ltd)

s7(2)(f)(i) - free and frank expression of opinions by or between or to members or officers or employees of any local authority

 

Carried

 

8.9        Confirmation of Information and Decisions in Open Meeting

Resolution  2020/72

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Dave Collard

That Council confirms that the following decisions contained in the part of the meeting held with public excluded be restated in public meeting.

8.3         Coopers Beach Christian Youth Camp - Remission Request

Resolution  2020/73

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr John Vujcich

That Council approve the remission of additional pan charges of $6,518.68 for the rating year 2020/21 provided that the group continue to provide the same level of community service; and that they remain a not for profit organisation.

Carried

Abstained:  Cr Kelly Stratford

8.4         Waima Tōpū B Trust - Incentivising Māori Economic Development Policy Application

Resolution  2020/74

Moved:       Cr Moko Tepania

Seconded:  Cr John Vujcich

That Council approve the application for remission under the Incentivising Māori Economic Development Policy, commencing with full remission of $28,182.81 in the current rating year 2020/21 with the final remission of 20% of rates in 2027/28.

Carried

8.8         Item Left to Lie On the Table - Appointment of Director to the Board of Northland Adventure Experience Limited (NAX)

Resolution  2020/75

Moved:       Mayor John Carter

Seconded:  Cr Rachel Smith

That Council:

a)      uplifts the report “Appointment of Director to the Board of Northland Adventure Experience Limited (NAX).

b)      appoints Councillor Moko Tepania as His Worship the Mayor’s replacement on the Northland Adventure Experience Limited (NAX) Board.

c)      agrees to indemnify Councillor Tepania for any professional negligence as a Director when acting in good faith in his capacity as a Director.

Carried

Against:      Crs Ann Court and John Vujcich

Carried

 

9          Karakia Whakamutunga – Closing Prayer

Nia Kara closed the meeting with a karakia.

10        Meeting Close

The meeting closed at 4:18 pm.

 

The minutes of this meeting will be confirmed at the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 29 October 2020.

 

...................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

6          Reports

6.1         Lease 8 Melba Street, Kaitaia to Nga Wawata Bi-Lingual Early Childhood Centre Ltd.

File Number:           A2972424

Author:                    Rob Koops, Property Services

Authoriser:              William J Taylor MBE, General Manager - Corporate Services

 

Purpose of the Report

That Council approve a further 2 x 3 year right of renewal of the lease on the premises located at 8 Melba Street in Kaitaia to Nga Wawata Bi-Lingual Early Childhood Education Centre Limited, from 1 July 2021, taking the final expiry date to 30 June 2027.

Executive Summary

·    Since 2012 Nga Wawata Bi-lingual Early Childhood Centre Ltd has leased the former library building on 8 Melba Street in Kaitaia.

·    The final expiry of the current lease is 30 June 2021.

·    The tenant has requested the addition of a 6-year (2 x 3 years each) right to renew the lease past the final expiry date.

·    A report on the feasibility of disposal of this council asset will be presented to the Te Hiku Community Board and Council in due course.

Recommendation

That Council approve a further 2 x 3 year right of renewal of the lease on the premises located at 8 Melba Street in Kaitaia to Nga Wawata Bi-Lingual Early Childhood Education Centre Limited, from 1 July 2021, taking the final expiry date to 30 June 2027.

 

1) Background

In March 2019 the Te Hiku Community Board resolved as follows:

The tenant, Nga Wawata Bi-Lingual Early Childhood Centre Limited (the Centre) is a Ministry of Education (MoE) licenced teacher led early childhood education and care centre. It is licenced for up to 40 children between the ages of 2 and 5 years and currently employs 8 staff. At the commencement of the lease the Centre, at its own cost, made significant improvements to the interior of the building (improvements to kitchen facilities, additional children’s toilets, etc.) in order to be fully compliant with MoE and council requirements. Resource Consent was approved for the change of use from a public library to an early childhood facility.

The lease with Nga Wawata Bi-Lingual Early Childhood Centre Limited is on standard Auckland District Law Society commercial terms and conditions and was renewed for 3 years on 1 July 2018. At the same time a rent review to “market rent” was instigated and a significant increase in rent was agreed to. Over the years the Centre has been a good tenant, running a professional business operation and providing a valuable service to the community.

The final term of the lease expires in June 2021 and the Centre has requested a further two rights of renewal of 3 years each.

2) Discussion and Options

The land on which the building is located is classified as a Local Purpose (community facilities) Reserve and in accordance with Clause 61(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, Council as the administering body, may lease all or any part of the reserve to any person, body, voluntary organisation, or society (whether incorporated or not) for any of the following purposes: community building, playcentre, kindergarten, Plunket room, or other like purposes.

A right of renewal means that the tenant can exercise the right to continue to lease the premises for a further term, or terms, on the same conditions the lease was entered into. The landlord cannot terminate the lease during the term, or terms, or change the conditions of the lease other than to review the rent.


A right of renewal gives a tenant security of tenure and allows it to plan and budget for the future. The prospect of a lease being terminated and for the tenant having to find and fit-out alternative premises gives uncertainty and could be extremely costly to the business it operates. From a (commercial) landlord perspective, having a good tenant operating a business that can pay market rent is an asset worth holding on to.

Council has several options:

Option 1: RECOMMENDED

Agree to a further 6-year lease by way of a two times 3 year right of renewal.

Option 2:

Let the final term run its cause and on expiry re-negotiate the lease with the current tenant.

Option 3:

Let the final term run its cause and on expiry advertise for Expressions of Interest from interested parties.

Reason for the recommendation

Over the years the Centre has been a good tenant, running a professional business operation and providing a valuable service to the community. The lease is on commercial terms and the rent is the “market rent” as determined by valuation. Council would not benefit from re-negotiating the lease or a change of tenants and could in fact find it difficult to attract a new tenant of this calibre.

3) Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

The lease allows for annual CPI (Consumer Price Index) rent increases. The current “market rent” as determined by valuation is $26.700+GST per annum and is reviewed on each renewal date.

 

Attachments

Nil


 

Compliance schedule:

Full consideration has been given to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 S77 in relation to decision making, in particular:

1.      A Local authority must, in the course of the decision-making process,

a)      Seek to identify all reasonably practicable options for the achievement of the objective of a decision; and

b)      Assess the options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

c)       If any of the options identified under paragraph (a) involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

2.      This section is subject to Section 79 - Compliance with procedures in relation to decisions.

Compliance requirement

Staff assessment

State the level of significance (high or low) of the issue or proposal as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

Low

State the relevant Council policies (external or internal), legislation, and/or community outcomes (as stated in the LTP) that relate to this decision.

Reserves Act 1977

State whether this issue or proposal has a District wide relevance and, if not, the ways in which the appropriate Community Board’s views have been sought.

The Te Hiku Community Board has considered and supports the recommendation.

State the possible implications for Māori and how Māori have been provided with an opportunity to contribute to decision making if this decision is significant and relates to land and/or any body of water.

The Centre is bi-lingual te reo Māori and English

Identify persons likely to be affected by or have an interest in the matter, and how you have given consideration to their views or preferences (for example – youth, the aged and those with disabilities.

N/A

State the financial implications and where budgetary provisions have been made to support this decision.

Current market rent is $26,700+GST per annum

Chief Financial Officer review.

The Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

6.2         Speed Limit Bylaw - Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North Review Area

File Number:           A2987894

Author:                    Roger Ackers, Manager - Strategy Development

Authoriser:              Darrell Sargent, General Manager - Strategic Planning and Policy

 

Purpose of the Report

The purpose of this report is to amend the Far North District Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 with the speed limits set by Council in the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate Review area and on Quarry Road, Kaitaia (Te Rangi Aniwaniwa School). And to set the date when the amendments to the Speed Limit Bylaw 2019 becomes operative and enforceable in the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate Review area.

Executive Summary

·        On 21 May 2020 Council, in its capacity as the Road Controlling Authority in the Far North, adopted the speed limits as an outcome of the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North speed limit review.  This review also encompassed Quarry Road near Kaitaia (Te Rangi Aniwaniwa School).

·        On 21 May 2020 Council also deferred the making of amendments to the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 until the signage to make the new speed limits enforceable were ready to be installed.

·        The Northland Transport Alliance has now confirmed 25 January 2021 as the date that the speed limits adopted on 21 May 2020 will become operative and therefore enforceable. The operative date is intended to allow the time required to install new signage and undertake any required engineering interventions to ensure the enforceability of the new speed limits.

·        The Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 can now be amended with an operative date of 25 January 2021 for the speed limits adopted by Council as part of the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North speed limit review.

·        This report was presented to the Strategy and Policy Committee at their meeting in 20 October 2020, who make the following recommendation to Council.

 

Recommendation

That Council

a)      adopt the amended Speed Limit Bylaw in its capacity as a Road Controlling Authority, pursuant to Section 22AB(1)(d) of the Land Transport Act 1998 with an operative date of 25 January 2021.

b)      authorises the Chief Executive to make any minor editorial corrections.

 

1) Background

Council is a Road Controlling Authority (RCA) within the Far North District and has a statutory role in managing the District’s local roads (except State Highways), including the setting of speed limits.  This statutory role as an RCA is set out under the Land Transport Act 1998, which also enables Council to make a bylaw that fixes the maximum speed of vehicles on any road for the safety of the public, or for the better preservation of any road (Section 22AB(1)(d)).

Council is undertaking a rolling review of speed limits in accordance with Road to Zero: A Road Safety Strategy for New Zealand 2020-2030.  The Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North review area was the first tranche of this rolling review in the Far North District.

At its meeting on 21 May 2020, Council in its capacity as a RCA, adopted new speed limits in the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North review area, as well as on Quarry Road near Kaitaia (Te Rangi Aniwaniwa School).  In confirming the new speed limits, Council considered all the matters set out Section 4.2(2) of the Setting of Speed Limits Rule 2017, including community feedback.  These matters were set out in the 21 May 2020 agenda item and the following reports that were attached to the agenda:

·    Speed Limits Bylaw Consultation - Submissions and Recommendations Report.

·    Regional Speed Limit Review Technical Report – Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate Review Area.

Council satisfied all its legal requirements for setting new speed limits under the Setting of Speed Limits Rule 2017 at its 21 May 2020 meeting.  Council is now able to formally make amendments to the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 with an operative date coinciding with the installation of new signage.

2) Discussion and Options

The Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North review area was chosen for the first speed limit review as it contained high benefit roads where a speed review would have a significant impact on road safety by reducing serious injury and fatal crashes.  In addition, there was identified community support for speed limit reductions in parts of the review area.

A detailed technical assessment was undertaken to identify safe and appropriate speeds on roads within the catchment area.  The technical assessment also set out all the matters that must be considered when setting a speed limit.  This technical assessment formed the basis of a Statement of Proposal which was publicly notified for public consultation in accordance with Section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Following the hearings and the collation and assessment of all written submissions, additional speed assessments were undertaken on roads and in areas where submissions sought outcomes that were different from that proposed as part of the public consultation.  As part of this assessment, a senior road safety engineer drove every road within the review area.

On 21 May 2020 Council adopted new speed limits for local roads that were part of the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North review.  At the same meeting Council also deferred the making of amendments to the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 until the signage to make the new speed limits enforceable were ready to be installed.

Option 1:  Council in its capacity as RCA, Council makes the amendments to the Speed Limit Bylaw 2019 as set out in Attachment 1 and confirm an operative date of 25 January 2021.

This is the preferred option as it will have a positive contribution to road safety and is consistent with previous Council decisions.

Option 2: Council, in its capacity as RCA declines to make the amendments to the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 as set out in Attachment 1.

This option is not recommended as it is inconsistent with Councils decisions made on 21 May 2020.  Option 2 would also be inconsistent with the National Road Safety Strategy and Speed Management Guidance.

Reason for the recommendation

The recommendations are consistent with implement decisions previously made by Council to adopt new speed limits in the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North review.Implementation

Signage will be installed in accordance with the Setting of Speed Limits Rule requirements and then unveiled on the operative date of 25 January 2021.  This implementation date has been set based on the availability of contractors to undertake the required work. In addition, the new speed limit changes will be communicated to the community leading up to and then after the operative date of 25 January 2021.

As part of the implementation New Zealand Police will be advised of the changes and the operative date of the new speed limits in the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North review area.  NZ Police are responsible for the enforcement of speed limits.  Experience from speed limit changes in other parts of the country indicate that the New Zealand Police normally take an educational approach in the first weeks of a change to speed limits.  Changes to speed limits do not normally influence the overall targeting of speed enforcement in the longer term.

The speed limit maps that are attached under a separate cover, containing the new speed limits in the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North review area, will be migrated to a Geographical Information System (GIS) before the next update to the Speed Limit Bylaw 2019. Utilising GIS will make it easier for Council to communicate speed limits to the community as this will be via an online portal.

Next tranche of speed limit reviews

Work will commence on the initial review process for the Kaitaia-Awaroa and Kohukohu-Broadwood catchment areas.  This includes the speed limits on Te Oneroa-A-Tohe / Ninety Mile Beach.  These catchment areas are programmed to be reviewed next as they include roads that have the highest risk ratings in Northland.  The Bay of Islands – Kerikeri area will follow the Kaitaia-Awaroa-Kohukohu-Broadwood review.

3) Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

The estimated overall cost to undertake the recommended changes to implement new speed limits within the review area is $190,000 to $300,000.

The expected life of a speed limit sign is seven years.  The average remaining effective life of speed limit signs within the review area is less than four years.  Most of the new signage will be replacing existing signs.  In addition, other Councils have adopted the use of stickers over existing signage.  Where this option proves viable, it will further reduce the overall costs of implementation.

Completion of some recommended engineering work to ensure a high level of compliance with new speed limits will require new Long Term Plan funding.

 

Attachments

1.      Far North District Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 Clear Copy - A2954359

2.      Far North District Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 Tracked Changes - A2954360

3.      Far North District Council Speed Limit Map Index and Legend - A2950804 (under separate cover)  

4.      Far North District Council Speed Limit Basemaps - A2950806 (under separate cover)   


 

Compliance schedule:

Full consideration has been given to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 S77 in relation to decision making, in particular:

1.      A Local authority must, in the course of the decision-making process,

a)      Seek to identify all reasonably practicable options for the achievement of the objective of a decision; and

b)      Assess the options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

c)       If any of the options identified under paragraph (a) involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

2.      This section is subject to Section 79 - Compliance with procedures in relation to decisions.

 

Compliance requirement

Staff assessment

State the level of significance (high or low) of the issue or proposal as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

Significance has been determined as Low under Councils Significance and Engagement Policy.

State the relevant Council policies (external or internal), legislation, and/or community outcomes (as stated in the LTP) that relate to this decision.

·    Council decision 21 May 2020 - Agenda item 6.3 Speed Limits Review - document number A2870967

·    Land Transport Act 1998

·    Setting of Speed Limits Rule 2017

·    Local Government Act 2002

·    New Zealand Road Safety Strategy 2020-2030

State whether this issue or proposal has a District wide relevance and, if not, the ways in which the appropriate Community Board’s views have been sought.

The setting of speed limits is of District wide relevance.

State the possible implications for Māori and how Māori have been provided with an opportunity to contribute to decision making if this decision is significant and relates to land and/or any body of water.

The recommended amendments have no specific implications for Māori.

Identify persons likely to be affected by or have an interest in the matter, and how you have given consideration to their views or preferences (for example – youth, the aged and those with disabilities.

A public consultation process was undertaken in accordance with Section 156 of the Local Government Act 2002. Written submissions were made available to Council and Council considered all written submissions when adopting the new speed limits at their 21 May Council meeting.

State the financial implications and where budgetary provisions have been made to support this decision.

There is an initial implementation cost to install new signage and remove older signage.  This cost is estimated at between $190,000 and $300,000 and is provided for in the 2020-2021 Financial Year (Road Safety Improvements).  There are longer term budget implications for the Long-Term Plan.

Chief Financial Officer review.

The Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

6.3         Māori Elected Members on Council

File Number:           A2964943

Author:                    Darrell Sargent, General Manager - Strategic Planning and Policy

Authoriser:              William J Taylor MBE, General Manager - Corporate Services

 

Purpose of the Report

To recommend that Council establish Māori wards for the 2022 and 2025 Local Government elections.

Executive Summary

·    The Local Electoral Act 2001 directs councils to undertake representation reviews at least every six years. Far North District Council last undertook a representation review, including Māori representation in 2015.

·    In 2015, Far North District Council resolved to poll electors on this matter. The poll was lost. The result was applied to the ensuing two electoral cycles (2016 and 2019).

·    Council is legally bound to review its electoral options now, including Māori representation, as part of the required six yearly review process of the Local Electoral Act 2001.

·    Council has held several workshops on Māori representation and has received advice in this regard. That advice and relevant reports support the introduction of Māori wards/constituencies.

·    Having received advice, reports and a chance to debate the intricacies of this provision Council can lead Local Government in the Northland region and introduce Māori wards.

 

Recommendation

That Council either:

a) establish Māori wards for the 2022 and 2025 Local Government elections, or

b) resolve to hold a poll of electors on whether or not to establish Māori Wards, with the result applicable to the 2022 and 2025 local body elections, or

c) resolve to hold a poll of electors during the 2022 local body elections, or

d) maintain status quo, noting that a poll may be demanded by the public.

 

 

1) Background

Local authorities are required to review their representation arrangements at least every six years. As defined by the Local Electoral Act 2001 (LEA), representation reviews are reviews of the representation arrangements for a local authority.

Local authorities’ representation reviews determine detailed arrangements for:

·    the number of electoral subdivisions (if any), and

·    their boundaries, names, and number of members.

For territorial authorities, the representation review includes deciding the:

·    basis of election (at large, wards, or a mix of both), and

·    the establishment of community boards.

In addition to the above representation arrangements, local authorities and communities have the

opportunity to consider the:

·    electoral system to be used for their elections: first past the post (FPP) or single transferable vote (STV), and

·    the establishment of Māori wards/constituencies.

 

These are matters for local discretion by the local authority. With the options relating to identifying appropriate representation arrangements, for and reflective of, a district and need to be resolved before detailed ward arrangements are determined.

The Council last undertook a representation review in 2015 with results applying to the 2016 and 2019 Local Government elections. At the time, the then Council decided not to establish Māori wards, resolving instead, to conduct a poll of electors. That poll was lost 32%/67%, with 45% of voters engaging in the process. Pursuant to the LEA, Council is again required to undertake a six-yearly review of its electoral options (in time for the 2022 Local Government elections).

Dedicated Māori wards, however, are but one of the provisions put in place by the Crown with the aim to increase Māori representation in local authority decision-making. Further to the LEA, the Council’s guiding legislative framework – the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) – provide a legal obligation for greater participation by Māori in council processes, and act to enhance the provisions of the LEA.

It is important for Council to note that the provisions of the LEA provide for governance representation which differs to participation as provided for in the LGA and RMA. Provisions of the LEA provide a direct avenue for Māori representatives to make governance decisions.

It is also important to note that these enabling provisions are not new. LEA provisions have been in place since 2001, the LGA provisions since 2002, and the RMA provisions since 1991 all of these strengthened several times over the years. Most notably in 2017 Mana Whakahono a Rohe (Iwi Participation Arrangements) provisions were introduced as a mandatory process, aimed again, at enhancing the participation of Māori in council RMA decision-making. 

While it is important to note complimentary legislation, this paper specifically addresses the option of governance representation and is the first step in the wider review process. Should Council resolve to establish Māori wards, addressing ward boundaries and names along with calculating ward numbers, will form part of a suite options that Council will consult on, mid-way through 2021.

2) Discussion and Options

Several workshops have been held on the LEA provisions. This high-level review provided an opportunity for councillors to engage in discussions and debate the benefits and disadvantages of introducing the provision for Maori elected members on Council.

The workshops and material indicated:

There is significant support by Māori for Council to introduce Māori wards, with a delegation meeting with, and providing this advice, directly to Council. Further, that a recommendation has been received by Northland Regional Council (NRC), from the Māori members of the Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party (TTMAC), recommending that they establish Māori constituencies. That of the 17 non-elected member seats currently filled on this working party, 13 of the iwi Māori affiliate groups either reside wholly or partially in the Far North District. This again is indicative of the support by iwi Māori for the introduction of Māori wards and or constituencies in the region.

Likewise, of the two key mana whenua groups that the Kaipara District Council (KDC) has engaged with, while they had not provided a recommendation to KDC at the time this report was written. It should be noted, that both mana whenua groups are represented on TTMAC and therefore it is fair to assume that they too, support the establishment of Māori wards.

Lastly, the Whangarei District Council (WDC) received a recommendation to establish their relationship committee as a formal standing committee of council. This successfully traversed the decision making of council, with the council endorsing the recommendation, and that of appointing members to other committees of council. It is also understood that the same committee intends to also recommend the introduction of Māori wards as well. However, this was not able to be qualified at the time this report was written.  

In relation to the three councils who have introduced wards/constituencies, both Waikato and Bay of Plenty Regional Councils have maintained them despite the six-yearly review clauses contained in the LEA. For Wairoa, having only been through their first electoral cycle, they are not required to review their decision until following the 2025 Local Body elections. However, they have noted the success of these seats so far and how, both council and the wider community have embraced the decision.

Council was also challenged to consider the LEA provisions against the legislative framework (of Acts that apply to local government), and the moral and legislative framework contained in the intent behind the Treaty of Waitangi. To bear in mind, when deciding, reports from the Waitangi Tribunal, the Human Rights Report on Māori representation and the recommendations of the Royal Commission into the Auckland Governance. All of which, indicate a preference for councils to implement Māori governance options in the spirit of the Treaty of Waitangi.

Having received this information there are four options for council to now consider:

1.   Option 1 – Establish Māori wards.

2.   Option 2 – Retain the status quo.

3.   Option 3 – Resolve to hold a poll in 2021 or combine it with the 2022 local body elections

4.   Option 4 – Status quo and wait to see if a poll is demanded.

In considering whether to install Māori elected members on Council, the following principles are also applicable to council’s decision in this regard. These principles are often noted as the key principles for applying the intent of the Treaty of Waitangi.

·    Participation: That a decision should reflect the community - the proportion of Māori in a district or region – and provide Māori with an opportunity to have direct input into the governance decision making of council.

·    Protection: Enable the provision for guaranteed Māori representation at the governance table.

·    Partnership: Acting in good faith having heard directly from Māori.  

The following table sets out an assessment of each option, including an assessment against the three principles: Participation, Protection, and Partnership.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantage

Principles

Option 1:

Establish Maori Wards

Improved depth of Council decision making capability that is more representative of the Far North’s diversity.  Diversity of thinking assists in identifying opportunities & mitigating risk.

Strengthened relationships with iwi. 

Leading by example and being a progressive Council.

Sends a strong signal on Council’s commitment to fair representation and equality in Northland.

Insufficient time to conduct district-wide consultation ahead of the 23 November 2020 deadline (but would form a part of the wider representation review consultation review).

Will require flow on changes to current representation arrangements.

Has the potential to bring about an adverse reaction in some sections of the Northland community.

Achieves all three Treaty of Waitangi based principles.

 

Option 2:

Retain the status quo

No change to the current ward system.

No change to councillor remuneration.

 

Relationship risk having sought advice from Māori but not following through on their desire to establish wards.

No certainty that there will be Māori representation via general elections.

Does not achieve any of the Treaty of Waitangi based Principles. 

Option 3:

Resolve to hold a poll either in 2021 or as part of the local body elections in 2022

Will provide an opportunity for the wider community to provide its views to Council ahead of any decision.

 

A poll combined with the 2022 elections will be 10% of the standalone poll – approximately $10k.

 

Relationship risk having sought advice from Māori but not following through on their desire to establish wards.

A poll in 2021 will cost approx. $90,000 and, to date, all polls undertaken by other councils, no matter what the Māori population, have not supported the establishment of Māori wards.

The results of the poll in 2022 will be binding for the 2025 and 2028 elections thus pushing it out for another triennium.

Simply replicates the decision of the last review –posing reputational risk. 

Does not achieve any of the Treaty of Waitangi based Principles.

Option 4:

Status quo and then wait to see if a poll is demanded

 Will provide an opportunity for the wider community to provide its views to Council ahead of any decision.

Relationship risk having sought advice from Māori but not following through on their desire to establish wards.

A poll will cost approx. $90,000 and, to date, all polls undertaken by other councils, no matter what the Māori population, have not supported the establishment of Māori wards.

Simply replicates the decision of the last review –posing reputational risk. 

Does not achieve any of the Treaty of Waitangi based Principles.

 

Reason for the recommendation

Through the establishment of Māori wards Council will ensure diversity and depth of decision-making. This decision also aligns with the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi of which the Council must recognise and consider when undertaking its duties under the LGA and RMA.

Implementing the provisions of the LEA will clearly articulate to Māori Council’s commitment to the various relationship agreements it has and the advice it sought and received. It would also take Council from a place of achieving very little in regard to its obligations to Māori as prescribed in legislation, to be a progressive council, leading by example.

3) Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

If Council resolves to establish Māori Wards, it will be required to publicly notify its decision and advise electors that they may demand a poll. Should this occur, Council will then need to undertake a poll. The cost of this has previously been factored into budgets secured for the wider representation review.

Attachments

1.      Attachment 1: Statutory process and timing Māori representation review - A2965087  


 

Compliance schedule:

Full consideration has been given to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 S77 in relation to decision making, in particular:

1.      A Local authority must, in the course of the decision-making process,

a)      Seek to identify all reasonably practicable options for the achievement of the objective of a decision; and

b)      Assess the options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

c)       If any of the options identified under paragraph (a) involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water sites, wāhi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

2.      This section is subject to Section 79 - Compliance with procedures in relation to decisions.

 

Compliance requirement

Staff assessment

State the level of significance (high or low) of the issue or proposal as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

This report has a low level of significance regarding Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. However, it will trigger requirements under the Local Electoral Act 2001. 

State the relevant Council policies (external or internal), legislation, and/or community outcomes (as stated in the LTP) that relate to this decision.

Local Electoral Act 2001 – provision for Māori representation.

Local Government Act 2002 – Māori participation in council decision making.

Resource Management Act 1991 – Māori participation in council decision making.

Treaty of Waitangi principles – Protection, Partnership and Participation.

Council’s Vision, Mission and Values as detailed in the Long-Term Plan.

Community outcomes – A wisely managed and treasured environment that recognises the special role of tangata whenua as kaitiaki and Proud, vibrant communities.

Whanaungatanga Kī Taurangi (and other Memorandum of Understanding) – relationship agreement with Iwi an agreement founded on the principles of Partnership, Participation and Protection.

State whether this issue or proposal has a District wide relevance and, if not, the ways in which the appropriate Community Board’s views have been sought.

A decision will apply to the district. Community Boards have been involved in the Council workshops; however, this is a decision of Council.

State the possible implications for Māori and how Māori have been provided with an opportunity to contribute to decision making if this decision is significant and relates to land and/or any body of water.

This report will be of significance to iwi Māori as it relates directly to Māori as elected members. As such, the Council has been in discussion with iwi and have received various reports as supplementary information.

Identify persons likely to be affected by or have an interest in the matter, and how you have given consideration to their views or preferences (for example – youth, the aged and those with disabilities.

If Council resolves to establish Māori wards this would form a part of a suite of information that would go out for wider public consultation mid-2021.

State the financial implications and where budgetary provisions have been made to support this decision.

There are no financial implications at this stage as budget has already been allocated to enable a representation arrangements review.

Chief Financial Officer review.

The Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report.

 

 



Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

Attachment 2: Statutory Process and Timing   

 

By 23 November 2020*

A local authority MAY resolve to introduce Māori representation for the next two triennial elections.

Section 19Z of LEA

 

By 30 November 2020*

IF a resolution has been made by a local authority to introduce Māori representation, a local authority  MUST give public notice that electors may at any time demand that a poll be held on Māori representation, and if a  poll outcome is to apply to the next triennial election, a demand for a poll must be received by 21 February 2021.

Section 19ZA of LEA

By 21 February 2021*

IF a demand for a poll that a specified electoral system be used for the next two triennial elections is received by 21 February 2021, a poll must be held by 21 May 2021.

Sections 29 and 30 of LEA

By 21 February 2021*

A local authority MAY also resolve to undertake a poll of electors that a specified electoral system be used for the next two triennial elections.

Section 31 of LEA

By 21 February 2021*

IF a demand for a poll on Māori representation is received by 21 February 2021, a poll must be held by 21 May 2021.

Section 19ZC of LEA

By 21 February 2021*

A local authority MAY also resolve to undertake a poll on Māori representation.

Section 19ZD of LEA

From 1 March 2021

Period commences for formal consultation/resolution of initial proposal for Representation Arrangements Review by local authority.

Section 19K (1AA) of LEA

By 21 May 2021*

If a successful demand for a poll has been received by 21 February 2021, or a resolution for a poll has been made by a local authority by 21 February 2021 (that a specified electoral system be used for the next two triennial elections), then a poll MUST be held within 89 days of notification.

Section 33 of LEA

By 21 May 2021*

If a successful demand for a poll has been received by 21 February 2021, or a local authority has made a resolution by 21 February 2021 (on Māori representation), then a poll MUST be held within 89 days of notification.

Section 19ZF of LEA

By 31 August 2021*

Period concludes         for consultation/resolution of initial proposal for Representation Arrangements Review by local authority.

Section 19H of LEA

By 8 September 2021*

A local authority MUST give public notice of resolution of initial proposal. One-month submission period.

Section 19M of LEA

By 8 October 2021*

Submission period closes.

Section 19M of LEA

By 19 November 2021*

Submissions heard by local authority and resolution of final proposal made by a local authority.

Section 19N of LEA

By 19 November 2021*

A local authority MUST give further public notice of its resolution of final proposal.   One-month appeal/objection period.

Section 19N of LEA

By 20 December 2021*

Appeal/objection period closes.

Section 19O of LEA

By 15 January 2022*

Forward all Representation Arrangements Review material to LGC (if appeal/objection received).

Section 19Q of LEA

Before 11 April 2022*

Determination by LGC

Section 19R of LEA

 

* may be earlier than but not later than

 

Dale Ofsoske, November 2019

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

6.4         Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party

File Number:           A2958303

Author:                    Bill Lee, Special Projects Manager - Te Hono

Authoriser:              Darrell Sargent, General Manager - Strategic Planning and Policy

  

Purpose of the Report

For Council to approve the advancement of the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery with a variation to the shareholding since Whangarei District Council has decided not to participate in the shareholding and governance. For Council to confirm 2 Elected Members to the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party.

Executive Summary

·        Far North District Council, Kaipara District Council, Northland Regional Council all resolved to forward the Mayoral Forum proposal to establish a joint delivery model for regional economic development; Whangarei District Council chose by resolution, not to participate.

·        Northland Regional Council subsequently resolved to continue with Far North District Council and Kaipara District Council. In addition, they resolved:

o   to form a working party with 6 Elected Members (2 from each of the 3 Councils) and requested Far North District Council to nominate 2 Elected Members.

o   to change the shareholding to fit a 3 Council model (100 shares between 4 Councils to 120 shares between 3 Councils).

·        Whangarei District Council may decide to participate in governance and shareholding in time for the 2021-31 Long Term Plan consultation.  If this happens, then the proposal should remain as resolved by Council at the Council Meeting on 25 June 2020.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a)   subject to non-participation by Whangarei District Council:

i)       agrees to continue the process of forming a joint delivery model for regional economic development with Northland Regional Council and Kaipara District Council (to run in accordance with the original decision of Council – 25 June 2020)

ii)      agrees, in principle, the new shareholding of 40 shares out of the 120 shares in total.

b)      agrees, if Whangarei District Council decides to participate in the joint delivery model, that there will be equal shareholdings between the four councils.

c)      agrees Councillor Vujcich and Councillor Clendon to be Far North District Council representatives on the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party of Northland Regional Council.

 

1) Background

At its meeting on 16 June 2020, Northland Regional Council (NRC) agreed to recommendations put forward by the Mayoral Forum for the joint delivery of regional economic development services in Northland. This agreement was given subject to District Council’s approval of the same recommendations / proposal.  The same Mayoral Forum recommendations were agreed to by Far North District Council (FNDC) on 25 June 2020 and Kaipara District Council (KDC) on 29 July 2020. 

Whangarei District Council (WDC), at its meeting on 27 August 2020, decided against the Mayoral Forum proposal.  However, the door is open for WDC to take up the offer of participating at any time in the future. While it may be perceived as disappointing, WDC’s decision not to participate has little material effect on the proposal. It is understood that WDC will continue to provide funding to Northland Inc. for the foreseeable future. In the 2021/22 Annual Plan year, WDC will still be the second largest Council funder of Northland Inc. after NRC.

The original proposal had 100 shares split evenly between the 4 Councils (25 each).  NRC’s new proposal is 120 shares split between 3 Councils (40 shares each). If at some point in the future WDC decides to become a shareholder, each Council would give up 10 shares (each Council having a 30-share ownership). This new shareholding will be formalised as part of the consultation process for the 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

2) Discussion and Options

One of the recommendations of the Mayoral Forum proposal was to enable District Councils to have input into the development of the Northland Inc. Statement of Intent (SOI) for 2021–2024 and the appointment of directors. NRC established a specific Working Party of Council fit for this purpose. At its Council meeting on 15 September, NRC resolved the following recommendations:

1.   That the report ‘Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party’ by Darryl Jones, Economist, be received.

2.   That council agrees to continue proceeding with the proposal of a joint delivery model for regional economic development as set out in the Mayoral Forum proposal with the participation of Kaipara District Council and Far North District Council. 

3.   That council authorises the establishment of the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party.

4.   That council adopts the Terms of Reference for the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party set out as Attachment One to this report.

5.   That council authorises the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party to serve as the ad hoc committee to recommend to council the appointment of three Northland Inc. directors for the term to commence 1 July 2021.

6.   That council appoint Cr Bain as Chair of the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party and Councillor Kitchen as the second council representative. 

7.   That the Council Chairperson not be appointed as ex-officio to the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party.

8.   That council invites Kaipara District Council and Far North District Council to each nominate two elected members to be representatives on the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party.

9.   That council delegates authority to the Chief Executive Officer to update the Terms of Reference for the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party with the names of the elected members nominated by Kaipara District Council and Far North District Council, along with any other minor amendments that may be necessary.

The NRC Council report including a Terms of Reference and letter of request for appointments to the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party are attached to this report.  This report seeks the appointment of two Elected Members to represent FNDC on the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party (NRC resolution 8 above). Councillors Vujcich and Clendon have agreed to be the nominees, but this needs to be ratified by resolution of Council.

FNDC agreed to consult on becoming a shareholder and contribute funding for the operation of Northland Inc. (as the NRC Council Controlled Organisation) for 2020/21 but will need to adopt the ongoing funding contribution for the 2021-31 Long Term Plan years as part of the Statement of Proposal and consultation alongside the 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

Options:

Option 1.  Withdraw from the process to participate in the joint council delivery of economic development services in Northland.  While Council had previously agreed to advance this proposal, with the withdrawal of Whangarei District Council, there is an opportunity for Far North District Council to withdraw also. If either Far North District Council or Kaipara District Council choose to withdraw, the joint delivery proposal will cease, and the current status quo will be retained; Northland Inc. will remain a 100% Council Controlled Organisation of Northland Regional Council.

Option 2.  Continue the process to participate in the joint delivery model for regional economic development and develop a Statement of Proposal for public consultation as part of the 2021-31 Long Term Plan with shareholding and governance sitting with the 3 Councils (NRC, FNDC, KDC). As noted earlier, the door remains open for Whangarei District Council to become part of the delivery service, if they decide to participate in the future.

Administration support option 2, as this gives us better visibility and participation in decision making for Northland Inc.’s presence and delivery of economic outcomes for the Far North.

Reason for the recommendation

The decision of WDC not to join the joint delivery proposal requires an alternative proposed shareholding arrangement. Additionally, a Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party has been established by NRC to be the vehicle through which District Councils can have input into the Statement of Intent (SOI) for Northland Inc. and FNDC have been requested to nominate 2 elected members to this Working Party.

3) Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

The Regional Economic Service Delivery Working Party will work towards an aligned Statement of Proposal to be consulted on by each Council. This will include shareholding and financial contribution to Regional Economic Development Service Delivery. The proposal will be adopted as part of the 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

Attachments

1.      Report, NRC Council Meeting 2020 09 15 - Establishment of the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party (including TOR) - A2984146

2.      Letter, Request for Appointments from FNDC to Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Working Party - 2020 09 15 - A2962235

3.      Copy of 2020-06-25 Council Report 8.3 [A2895537] - A2988978  


 

Compliance schedule:

Full consideration has been given to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 S77 in relation to decision making, in particular:

1.      A Local authority must, in the course of the decision-making process,

a)      Seek to identify all reasonably practicable options for the achievement of the objective of a decision; and

b)      Assess the options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

c)       If any of the options identified under paragraph (a) involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

2.      This section is subject to Section 79 - Compliance with procedures in relation to decisions.

 

Compliance requirement

Staff assessment

State the level of significance (high or low) of the issue or proposal as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

Low.

State the relevant Council policies (external or internal), legislation, and/or community outcomes (as stated in the LTP) that relate to this decision.

Amendment to a previous decision of Council.  Development of a Statement of Proposal for the 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

State whether this issue or proposal has a District wide relevance and, if not, the ways in which the appropriate Community Board’s views have been sought.

District wide.

State the possible implications for Māori and how Māori have been provided with an opportunity to contribute to decision making if this decision is significant and relates to land and/or any body of water.

Will be considered as part of engagement/consultation for 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

Identify persons likely to be affected by or have an interest in the matter, and how you have given consideration to their views or preferences (for example – youth, the aged and those with disabilities.

All ratepayers.  Consultation of the proposal as part of the 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

State the financial implications and where budgetary provisions have been made to support this decision.

Budgetary provision is made in the 2020/21 Annual Plan.  Future provision will be determined as part of the 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

Chief Financial Officer review.

The Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

8.3         Regional Economic Development

File Number:           A2895537

Author:                    Vicki Begbie, Manager - Business Development

Authoriser:              Shaun Clarke, Chief Executive Officer

  

Purpose of the Report

This purpose of this report is to propose a Regional Economic Development service delivery model, governance arrangements and indicative funding model for consideration and inclusion in the 2020-2021 Annual Plan and 2021-2031 Long Term Plan consultation process.

Executive Summary

·      The Mayoral Forum tasked the Chief Executives of Northland’s four Council’s to develop an appropriate business model for consideration by Northlands’ Councils following the formal S17A Service Delivery Review completed by Marin Jenkins Consultants in 2017. 

 

·    Over the course of 2019 to February 2020, the Chief Executives propose a two staged approach for the future delivery of regional economic development services:

 

1.    An enhanced Northland Inc. with the District Councils having input into Northland Inc.’s Statement of Expectations and input in the appointment of directors in return for a modest investment that is aligned to the 2020 – 2021 Annual Plan year.

 

2.    A joint regional CCO, with equal shareholding, governance via a joint committee, with 60% of funding from Northland Regional Council and 40% from the three District Councils, that is aligned to the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan Cycle.

 

·    The proposal considers the level funding by the Northland and District Councils, the timing of public consultation and the consideration of the development of a regional economic development strategy be completed under Northland|Forward Together.

 

·    The proposed regional economic development service delivery model considers:

The structure of each service delivery model.

a.   The governance features of each model.

b.   The proposed funding from Northland Regional Council targeting 60% contribution over six years, whilst targeting a 40% funding contribution from the District Councils over six years.

c.   The advantages, disadvantages and overall benefits.

d.   An indicative timeline for implementing both stages to the alignment to the 2020-2021 Annual Plan Cycle and the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan Cycle, which will incorporate the special consultation process required to establish a joint regional CCO.

 

·    The Mayoral Forum endorsed their support of the proposal at the Mayoral Forum on the 24th February 2020 and endorsed this standard agenda paper for each Council’s consideration.

 

·    The proposed recommendation for the future delivery of regional economic development services is for Northland Regional Council and Whangarei, Kaipara and Far North District Councils’ consideration and approval for inclusion and community consultation in the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan.

 

Recommendation

That Council agree:

1.   a) Stage One whereby the Northland Regional Council share the appointment of directors and input to the Statement of Intent process with Whangarei, Far North and Kaipara District Councils, in return for agreed funding for the 2020-2021 Annual Plan Year. 

b) Far North District Council contribute eighty-two thousand dollars to Northland Inc. for the 2020-2021 Annual Plan Year.

 

2.   In principle to the proposal that recommends Northland Inc. be modified to become a joint regional CCO;

a.   with a formal joint committee to provide oversight,

b.   a funding arrangement that Northland Regional Council contribute 60% and Whangarei, Far North and Kaipara District Councils contribute 40% and

c.   this is achieved over a six-year time frame aligned to the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan Cycle and

d.   Public consultation to establish Northland Inc. as a joint regional CCO is included and aligned to the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan consultation process of each Northland Council.

 

3.   To support, in principle, the development of a Regional Economic Development Strategy for inclusion in the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan Cycle, subject to scope, resources and funding.

 

 

Background

Martin Jenkins Consultants undertook the review of Northland Council economic development functions and activities in 2017.  The subsequent report highlighted:

·    There are no major gaps in the types of economic development activities provided by Northland Councils and Northland Inc.

·    There is little overlap of economic development activities.

·    There are five key opportunities for the Councils to work more efficiently and effectively together to increase the collective impact.

A regional economic development strategy, goals and priorities that would provide clear guidance on the activities that should be delivered in the region. 

Regional destination marketing.

Regional events promotion guided by a regional visitor and events strategy.

Maori/Iwi economic development.

Greater reach of services into the Far North and Kaipara through a hub and spoke delivery model.

The Martin Jenkins report recommended that Northland Inc. currently a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) of Northland Regional Council, become a jointly owned CCO, with a joint shareholding across the four Councils and a Joint Committee to provide direction and oversee Northland Inc.’s performance and resourcing.

The Martin Jenkins report highlighted the key benefits of the recommendation are:

·    Greater alignment of economic development priorities and outcomes across Councils and Northland Inc.

·    Better opportunity to leverage the resources of all to achieve common goals and objectives.

·    Minimal disruption to Northland Inc. or Council operations and delivery as a result of the changes.

·    Opportunity to implement a hub and spoke business model with presence in the Far North and Kaipara.

·    Increased flexibility / agility to being able to make decisions about changes to activities across Councils and Northland Inc. through a joint committee structure.

·    Ability for individual Councils to have input into the Expectation of Purpose and Statement of Intent process.

·    Ability for individual Councils to have input into the programme of work and projects being delivered by Northland Inc. via the Statement of Intent process.

·    Increased opportunity to identify efficiencies in the delivering activities across all Councils and Northland Inc. as a result of increased engagement.

 

There are key costs and risks associated with the implementation of a jointly owned CCO.

·    Time and costs associated with public consultation on the changes to the existing CCO arrangements.

·    The legal re-arrangement.

·    An increase in staff and elected members time required to develop and agree on priorities with Northland Inc., the Shareholders Agreement, the Joint Committee role and structure, out-put and out-come framework and the performance and reporting framework.

·    An increase in Northland Inc. staff to work with individual Councils to achieve the outcomes and outputs determined by the formal Joint Committee.

·    Costs with extending Northland Inc.’s services into the districts (set-up and co-ordination costs), although some costs could be minimised by sharing with others.

 

To date Northland Regional Council and Northland Inc. have implemented recommendations from the Martin Jenkins review regarding the operations of the Investment and Growth Fund, the process for developing the statement of intent, improved reporting and connection with the District Councils.  Minimal progress has been made on the five opportunities for Councils to work together.

The Mayoral Forum tasked the Chief Executives to develop an appropriate business model for consideration by all Councils.  For clarification, this proposal has not been presented to the Northland Regional Council or Northland Inc. for consideration.

The Chief Executives and senior management held a workshop on the 23rd January 2019 and took a fresh approach to developing a regional delivery model, building on the success of Northland Inc. and incorporating the recommendations of the Martin Jenkins Review.  The Chief Executives agreed:

 

·    The principles for the development of a model and subsequent report.

·    The key drivers and priorities for economic development in Northland.

·    The report will recommend a preferred service delivery option to the Mayoral Forum prior to the October Local Body election.

·    The new Councils and Mayoral Forum will make any decisions to implement or otherwise, post the October Local Body elections.

A cross- council team was brought together in February 2019, to propose a service delivery model for consideration by all Councils and build on the strengths of Northland Inc. and the recommendations of the Martin Jenkins Review. 

The cross-council team undertook a short study of three regional economic entities and arrived at the same conclusions as the Martin Jenkins study, that a joint regional CCO is the most suitable vehicle to deliver a regional service.

The first draft of the Regional Economic Development Service Delivery Options Report was presented to the CEs Forum May 2019 and the Mayoral Forum May 2019.  However, the recommendations of the report were left on the table and further work was required.

Several workshops and discussions with the CEs Forum and the Mayoral Forum post October 2019 elections discussed support for regional economic development and the development of a regional economic development strategy.

Key points are:

·    The final entity must be stable for performance not to be compromised.

·    The CEs to propose a long-term vision regarding funding and representation.

·    Commitment from all four Councils to be actively participating and contributing for regional economic development to be successful.

·    Commitment to one economic development services agency in Northland.

Discussion and Next Steps

At present, the main economic development services being delivered by Northland Inc. and Northland Councils are:

 

Delivered by Northland Inc. for the Region

Delivered by Councils for respective districts

Business development, business start-up advisory

Event and tourism promotion - WDC

Promotion of innovation, including the digital enablement plan and broadband extension

Business attraction – industry, developers, regulatory advice

Investment attraction and facilitation including investment in Northland focused events, Provincial Growth Fund infrastructure and district and regional projects

Community Development – Community and district focused support, funding and facilitation

Skills support, provision of support for IGR applications and funding

I-Sites (WDC and FNDC)

Destination marketing and management re international trade and tourism

Provincial Growth Fund initiatives and applications

Industry development and support to major projects and TTNEAP projects

 

 

At this point in time, further work would be required to determine what functions and services would be undertaken by the joint CCO and the District Councils.

I.e. whether (any) district focused development, event and tourism promotions, PGF and funding applications would be better being a function of the joint CCO.

 

Northland Inc. has recently commissioned two studies to be completed regarding:

·    Feasibility of increasing the level of delivery of Northland Inc. to the Far North and West Coast.

·    Maori Economic Development.

 

A new Board is in place chaired by Sarah Peterson and Murray Reade joined Northland Inc. as Chief Executive in 2019, with a wealth of leadership experience, tourism sector experience and a strong history of working with community and stakeholders. 

 

Given the combination of the newly appointed Northland Inc. Board of Directors and a recently appointed Chief Executive for Northland Inc. coupled with new Councils and elected members and the economic impact of post Covid-19, it is time to consider what the future delivery of regional economic development services has the potential to be over the next three to four months in order to meet the 2021/2031 Long Term Plan timeframes.

 

Post the 2019 local government elections, progress has focused on:

·    The equitability and affordability of financial contributions from the District Councils.

·    Shareholding and Voting Rights

·    Timeframes and 2021-2031 Long Term Plan consultation

·    Risks, obstacles and issues from preventing progress

 

The proposal builds on the Martin Jenkins recommendation that a joint regional CCO is the most suitable business model to deliver economic development services to Northland.  Not only does this follow best practice, but would also likely gain support from Central Government, where government would be communicating at a regional level and Northland effectively harnessing central government funding and support. 

 

Funding of Northland Inc.

Currently Northland Regional Council fund Northland Inc. and the Investment Growth Reserve Fund (IGR) through their commercial activities and Whangarei District Council fund a cash contribution of circa $105,000 per annum plus up to one FTE that is seconded to Northland Inc.  Far North and Kaipara District Council currently do not make any contribution but have done so in the past.

The proposal recommends Northland Regional Council continue to fund Northland Inc. and the IGR in line with the level of funding committed in their 2018-2028 Long Term Plan.  From the commencement of the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan Cycle the District Councils will progressively build up their contribution until it represents 40% of the total funding allocation made to these two functions.

The IGR was established in 2011-2012 to help fund economic projects that will increase jobs and economic performance in Northland.  The reserve is financed by income from Northland Regional Council’s various investments and potential projects are scoped and assessed by Northland Inc.

The objective of the IGR is to provide a fund that enables Northland Regional Council make strategic investments that lift the long-term growth of Northland.  Allocations from the fund must be one of the following:

·    Operational expenditure for Northland Inc.

·    Project development

·    Enabling investment

 

The option of the District Councils building their contribution to 40% over a three-year time period was deemed unaffordable in such a short timeframe, despite their being less risk if the transition is completed in one Long Term Plan cycle.  To ease the impact of economic development expenditure on the District Councils a six-year transition is recommended.

 

Joint Regional CCO – Aligned to the 2021-2031 LTP and a transition period of six years

·    Target Funding: NRC funding 60% of Northland Inc. and the IGR from commercial activity and the balance of 40% would be funded by the District Councils

·    The methodology for the proportion of funds that will be funded from each Council was also given further thought.  The proposed funding ratio for the District Councils is based on population numbers in each district.

 

 

Council

Current Population

Percentage of Contribution

Whangarei District Council

91,400

51%

Far North District Council

64,400

36%

Kaipara District Council

23,200

13%

        

 

These proportions will be reviewed at each Long-Term Plan Cycle.  Based on the above table the proposed contribution required from each Council over a six-year period would be:

 

51%

36%

13%

Year

NRC

WDC

FNDC

KDC

Total

Population

 

91400

64400

23200

179000

2021/22

89%

6%

4%

1%

100%

2022/23

80%

10%

7%

3%

100%

2023/24

74%

13%

9%

3%

100%

2024/25

68%

16%

12%

4%

100%

2025/26

64%

18%

13%

5%

100%

2026/27

60%

20%

14%

5%

100%

 

Whilst Northland Regional Council will maintain funding Northland Inc. per their current Long-Term Plan commitments, it’s proposed the three District Councils contribute a further 40% over the six-year transition period.  The indicative share of financial contribution would be:

 

Year

NRC

WDC

FNDC

KDC

Total

2021/22

$1.811M

$117K

$82K

$29K

$2,082M

2022/23

$1.852M

$241K

$169K

$61K

$2,357M

2023/24

$1.937M

$349K

$246K

$89K

$2,632M

2024/25

$1.984M

$475K

$335K

$121K

$2,910M

2025/26

$2.033M

$587K

$413K

$149K

$3,191M

2026/27

$2.084M

$709K

$500K

$180K

$3,473M

 

 

The six-year transition period represents two LTP cycles and two election cycles.  Maintaining political support through this transition period, whilst progressively increasing financial contributions, may be challenging and does represent a risk to the longevity of the model.  However, as discussed earlier, a three-year transition period was deemed unaffordable by the District Councils.

 

The allocation of the total level of funding provided from the District Councils and Northland Regional Council between Northland Inc. operations and the IGR will determined by requirements of the Northland Inc.’s Statement of Intent and supporting budgets, with the differences being transferred to the IGR and available to support the priorities and projects agreed by the four Councils. 

 

Shareholding and Governance Arrangements

The Martin Jenkins report recommends establishing a formal joint committee across the four Councils to provide direction to Northland Inc. and jointly recommend Northland Inc’s Board appointments.  The report also recommends establishing a Shareholders Agreement between the four Councils to govern the relationship and developing a joint Statement of Intent and service agreements with individual Councils.  Further consideration has been given to options for shareholding and voting rights based on:

 

·    Weighted Rights Model Based on the level of financial contribution from each Council

This is where a formal joint committee is established, and the representation and votes are based on the level of financial contribution. 

 

Formal Joint Committee Membership

NRC

FNDC

WDC

KDC

Years 1 - 3

7 members

4

1

1

1

Years 4 - 6

11 members

6

2

2

1

 

With this model Northland Regional Council retains the deciding vote as the District Councils contribute 40% of the financial contribution and Northland Regional Council 60%.

 

Or in the alternative

·    Consensus Model: Based on equal shareholding across the four Councils

This is based on the shareholding being equal i.e. each Council having an equal shareholding in Northland Inc. and the formal joint committee membership is made up of one representative from each Council (one vote).

Decision making is to be consensus building.  In the event that consensus cannot be reached then a vote would be taken with votes weighted proportional to the funds provided in that particular year.

 

The proposed governance model features are:

 

Equal shareholding by Northland Regional Council selling twenty-five shares at one dollar each to Whangarei, Far North and Kaipara District Councils.  This will provide the four Councils with an equal shareholding of 25 shares each. 

Governance would be via a formal Joint Committee

The Formal Joint Committee would appoint the commercial focused Northland Inc. Board of Directors on merit.

All Councils to contribute and have input through setting the Statement of Expectations regarding, the objectives, priorities, deliverables, performance and reporting framework and outcomes for the region

Allocation of Investment Growth Reserve delegated to the formal Joint Committee.  This would enable the District Councils input into the decision making around the allocation of the IGR from the outset.

 

Consultation

Establishing Northland Inc. as a joint regional CCO will require public consultation, therefore this is proposed to be aligned with the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan process across the region provided the four Northland Councils give agreement to do so.

 

Obstacles and Sensitivities Preventing Progress

An assessment has been completed regarding the obstacles and sensitivities preventing progress at an individual Council level.

 

The main issues are:

·    The new entity must have stability to last a decade or more and the need for a secure financial baseline.

·    Political buy-in, Councils must agree to the “new” Northland Inc. being the provider of economic development services in Northland.

·    The lack of a regional economic development strategy.

·    Building trust and stability, monitoring effort and distribution of benefit.

·    Equitability by medium term equitable distribution in proportion to contribution.

 

The proposal addresses each of these issues, either through the business model being proposed, the long-term funding contributions from NRC and the District Councils, the commitment from Northland Councils that the ‘new’ Northland Inc. will be the one organisation that delivers economic development services for the region. 

 

The Councils also have input to the Statement of Intent process via the formal Joint Committee, and the Consensus Voting model promotes building trust.  The out-put out-come framework together with the performance and reporting framework enable the monitoring of effort and measurement of the distribution of benefit.

 

Regional Economic Development Strategy

 

The Martin Jenkins report highlighted the lack of an overarching regional economic development plan that brings together TTNEAP, NorthlandForward Together, He Tangata, Northland Councils Plans and Northland Inc. priorities.  The aim should be for the strategy and plan to be more aspirational about the future of the region and to provide greater direction about how economic development activities will support the future vision.

 

The development of a regional strategy is estimated to be a two-year process and will require external consultants together with funding and resources from Northland Councils.  The development of the strategy should be led by Northland Councils, rather than Northland Inc. and be completed under Northland Forward Together.  A scope of work, together with funding and resourcing requirements will need to be completed to inform the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan process.

 

 

The Future

The proposed regional joint CCO together with the proposed governance and funding model provides a greater level of stability, where the individual Councils are actively engaged via a joint committee and coupled with the development of a regional economic development strategy that would underpin the objectives, priorities, funding requirements and outcomes to be delivered by Northland Inc.

By converting Northland Inc. into a regional joint CCO it should enable:

·    Greater reach of services into the Far North and Kaipara via a hub and spoke model in accordance with contribution, where economic investment is most needed to lift the economy and standard of living for the community.

·    Greater engagement and participation of Maori/Iwi.  This is a priority for all four Northland Councils.

·    Central Government will be communicating with one agency for Northland, and this would likely gain support from Central Government, where government would be communicating at a regional level and Northland Inc. effectively harnessing available central government funding and support.

·    The District Councils would have greater control and insight into the monitoring of performance and the distribution of benefit throughout the region. This could be done by: regular meetings between Northland Inc. and the formal Joint Committee, Annual strategy sessions with individual Councils, regular meetings between CEs of Councils and CE of Northland Inc., and overall reporting of progress to Northland Councils.

·    There should be greater alignment of economic development priorities and outcomes across Councils and Northland Inc.  Even more so with the development of the regional economic development strategy.

·    Specialisation/centre of excellence approach regional economic development that could potentially be more attractive.

·    Support the Covid-19 state of emergency economic recovery and re-building of the Northland economy.

Some examples of specific tangible benefits associated with increased economic development funding are:

·    Greater ability to help councils develop funding applications for projects.

·    Development of a regional destination marketing and event strategy.

·    Resourcing to champion and improve digital (broadband and mobile phone) connectivity.

·    Increased funds in the IGR to be able to allocate as Project Investment co-funding for new initiatives.

The proposal means that there will be a call on resources and funding:

·    The conversion of the existing Northland Inc. to a regional joint CCO will require public consultation, but it should have little disruption to Northland Inc. and Council operations.  The implementation will require increased resources regarding the governance arrangements i.e.

Shareholders Agreement

Joint Committee role

Performance and reporting framework

Output and Outcome framework

·    The time and costs associated with public consultation via the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan.

·    The costs associated with extending Northland Inc’s services into the Far North and Kaipara.

The Martin Jenkins report discusses that the costs and risks are manageable and will not outweigh the benefits of the proposal.

Recommendation

1.   Stage One – Aligned to the 2020/2021 Annual Plan

The proposal recommends Northland Inc. should increase its governance participation with the District Councils, in return for a commitment to funding and resourcing.

The proposal recommends:

·    Shared appointment of directors by a formal Appointment Board made up of four representatives from NRC and one representative each from WDC, FNDC and KDC.

·    Each representative to the Appointment Board will have one vote, thus the majority vote is with NRC.

·    Each Council would appoint their representative to the Appointment Board for a term of one year, commencing 1 July 2020.

·    WDC, FNDC and KDC would have input into the Statement of Intent process.

·    Contribution of funding:

Whangarei District Council                  $105K p.a.

Far North District Council                    $82K p.a.

Kaipara District Council                       $25K p.a.

WDC will continue to contribute up to one FTE to Northland Inc.

NRC will continue to fund Northland Inc. and the IGR Fund per their current Long-Term Plan

2.   Stage Two – Regional Joint CCO – Aligned to the 2021/2022 LTP Cycle

The proposal recommends that Northland Inc. be converted to a jointly owned CCO, overseen by a Formal Joint Committee of council representatives.

The proposal recommends:

·    Equal shareholding by NRC selling 25 shares at one dollar each to WDC, FNDC and KDC, providing the four participating Northland Councils with an equal shareholding of 25 shares each.

·    Governance via a formal Joint Committee with representation from each of the four Councils, by each Council having one representative.

·    Formal Joint Committee to appoint Directors to Northland Inc. based on merit.

·    Re-attainment of Northland Inc.’s current policy of rotation for appointment of directors.

·    Northland Councils all have input into to the Statement of Intent process via the Joint Committee.

·    Allocation of the Investment Growth Reserve delegated to the Joint Committee

·    Decision making on the Joint Committee to be made by consensus and failing that by vote proportionally weighted to the funds provided in that particular year.

The proposal recommends funding the regional joint CCO over a transition period of six years, whereby Northland Regional Council maintain funding levels per their 2018-2028 Long Term Plan, and the District Councils increase their funding contributions to a total combined value of 40% over the same period.

 

The development of a regional economic strategy would better inform the priorities, deliverables and outcomes to be achieved by Northland Inc. The proposal recommends the strategy is developed under Northland Forward Together and to develop a brief including resources, funding and timeframes for consideration.

The proposal recommends that total funding of Northland Inc. and IGR progresses to $3.473M by 2026/2027. 

Year

NRC

WDC

FNDC

KDC

Total

2021/22

$1.811M

$117K

$82K

$29K

$2,082M

2022/23

$1.852M

$241K

$169K

$61K

$2,357M

2023/24

$1.937M

$349K

$246K

$89K

$2,632M

2024/25

$1.984M

$475K

$335K

$121K

$2,910M

2025/26

$2.033M

$587K

$413K

$149K

$3,191M

2026/27

$2.084M

$709K

$500K

$180K

$3,473M

Note: 2% inflationary adjustment has been applied.  

Timeframes

An indicative timeline is included in Attachment One, page 2.  There are key timeframes that would need to be met regarding:

·    Individual Council approval for Stage One funding to be included in the 2020/21 Annual Plans.

·    Individual Council approval to support Stage Two, the development of a regional economic development strategy and the required funding go to each Council for their approval to be included in the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan consultation process.

·    The 2021-2031 Long Term Plan consultation process.

·    Planning for the transition and have all preparation in plans to implement prior to July 2021 (Subject to consultation and individual Council adoption).

Next Steps

Following support by the Mayoral Forum at their meeting on the 25th May 2020, discussion with Northland Inc. and Northland Regional Council is underway. 

Each of the District Councils will present to their respective Councils’ a standard agenda paper that has been prepared and endorsed by the Mayoral Forum at their meeting on the 25th May 2020.

Each Council is to consider the merits of the proposed service delivery model and the development of a regional economic development strategy, funding and resourcing for inclusion in the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan and Consultation process.

Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

The draft 2020-2021 Annual Plan budget provides for up to a $90,000 contribution to Northland Inc.

All Northland Councils will need to agree to the proposal to modify Northland Inc. to a regional joint CCO and inclusion in the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan consultation process.  If all four Northland Councils do agree to the proposal then FNDC will need to include the following investment into the draft 2021-2031 Long Term Plan.

The rating implications for the proposal are:

Year

Proposed FNDC Financial Contribution

Impact on Rates

2021-2022

$82,000

0.10%

2022-2023

$169,000

0.21%

2023-2024

$246,000

0.31%

2024-2025

$335,000

0.42%

2025-2026

$413,000

0.52%

2026-2027

$500,000

0.63%

 

If the proposal is successful and all four Northland Councils approve the modification of Northland Inc. following the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan consultation process, there needs to be commitment that all economic development activity for the region is delivered by Northland Inc. rather than the District Councils. 

The above proposed financial contributions would need to be offset against any “savings” from within the organisation as FNDC would no longer be delivering the economic development function.

 

Attachments

1.      Attachment One -  Regional Economic Development on a Page June 2020 - A2895990   

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

6.5         Re-Affirm Approval Of Unbudgeted Funds for Drought Resilience Work in 2020/2021

File Number:           A2986369

Author:                    Glenn Rainham, Manager - Infrastructure Operations

Authoriser:              Andy Finch, General Manager - Infrastructure and Asset Management

 

Purpose of the Report

To revoke a resolution made at the Council meeting on 25 August 2020 and replace with a resolution that better reflects the intent of Council, approving the package of water resilience works required for delivery in the 2020/2021 year.

Executive Summary

·        Council considered and approved the funding of a number of water resilience projects for delivery in the 2020/2021 year at its Council meeting of 25 August 2020.

·        Wording within the Council resolution of 25 August 2020 however, made the approval unclear.

·        The resolution indicated they were only approved subject to adequate funding from other sources. Management do not believe this was the intent of Council.

·        To ensure these projects are delivered no matter the source of funding (Council or external), a clearer resolution is required.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a)      Revoke Council resolution 2020/50 that was approved at the Council meeting of 25 August 2020;

“That Council, subject to adequate funding from other sources being approved, approve

a)      unbudgeted capital funding of $1,184,000 for a new water supply bore in the deep aquifer at Monument Hill in Kaikohe.

b)      unbudgeted capital funding of $15,000 for pH treatment at the Opononi/Omapere water treatment plant.

c)      unbudgeted capital funding of $70,000 for amending the Kawakawa water take consent to remove the residual flow requirements.

d)      unbudgeted capital funding of $100,000 for a new self-cleaning screen at the intake for the Paihia water treatment plant.

e)      unbudgeted capital funding of $150,000 for the design, consenting and construction of a permanent weir at the Awanui River intake for the Kaitaia water treatment plant.

f)       unbudgeted capital funding of $500,000 for the design, installations and commission of new clarifiers at the Kerikeri water treatment plant.

g)      unbudgeted capital funding of $100,000 for the purchase of leak detection equipment to be use across the district on all water supplies.”

b)      Approve

i)       Unbudgeted capital funding of $1,184,000 for a new water supply bore in a deep aquifer at Monument Hill in Kaikohe; and

ii)      Unbudgeted capital funding of $15,000 for pH treatment at the Opononi/Omapere water treatment plant; and

iii)     Unbudgeted capital funding of $70,000 for amending the Kawakawa water take consent to remove the residual flow requirements; and

iv)     Unbudgeted capital funding of $100,000 for a new self-cleaning screen at the intake for the Paihia water treatment plant; and

v)      Unbudgeted capital funding of $150,000 for the design, consenting, and construction of a permanent weir at the Awanui River intake for the Kaitaia water treatment plant; and

vi)     Unbudgeted capital funding of $500,000 for the design, installations, and commission of new clarifiers at the Kerikeri water treatment plant; and

vii)    Unbudgeted capital funding of $100,000 for the purchase of leak detection equipment to be used across the district on all water schemes.

 

 

1) Background

Council considered a report as Agenda Item 5.1 at its meeting of 25 August 2020. The report titled “Approval of Unbudgeted Funds for Drought Resilience Work in 2020/2021 financial year” [see Attachment 1] outlined a programme of work for 2020/2021, that are urgent and relatively straight forward to deliver, and aimed at improving the resilience of our water supplies through drought.

Council approved this programme of work for 2020/2021 with the following resolution:

Resolution  2020/50

Moved:         Mayor John Carter

Seconded:    Cr Kelly Stratford

That Council, subject to adequate funding from other sources being approved, approve

a)      unbudgeted capital funding of $1,184,000 for a new water supply bore in the deep aquifer at Monument Hill in Kaikohe.

b)      unbudgeted capital funding of $15,000 for pH treatment at the Opononi/Omapere water treatment plant.

c)      unbudgeted capital funding of $70,000 for amending the Kawakawa water take consent to remove the residual flow requirements.

d)      unbudgeted capital funding of $100,000 for a new self-cleaning screen at the intake for the Paihia water treatment plant.

e)      unbudgeted capital funding of $150,000 for the design, consenting and construction of a permanent weir at the Awanui River intake for the Kaitaia water treatment plant.

f)       unbudgeted capital funding of $500,000 for the design, installations and commission of new clarifiers at the Kerikeri water treatment plant.

·             g)      unbudgeted capital funding of $100,000 for the purchase of leak detection equipment to be use across the district on all water supplies.

In Favour:       Crs John Carter, Ann Court, David Clendon, Dave Collard, Felicity Foy, Rachel Smith, Kelly Stratford, Moko Tepania and John Vujcich

Against:               Nil

Abstained:         Cr Mate Radich

Carried

 

The highlighted phrase above has proved difficult to get this programme of work underway. Parts of the Monument Hill new bore project is underway; however, continuation of this and the other projects listed require secure funding to proceed. 

It is the writers understanding that this was not the intent of Council when this resolution was passed. The writers understanding was that Council wanted these water resilience projects funded and delivered irrespective to whether external funding is sourced.

It is believed that the intent of those highlighted words was to indicate that external funding is being sought.

2) Discussion and Options

Option 1:   Resolution 2020/50 remains

Water resilience projects identified for 2020/2021-year delivery will remain on-hold subject to external funding. Should the 3-Waters Reform Stimulus funding not be received, the projects would not proceed and some supplies may be at risk over this summer/autumn period.

Option 2:   Amend the resolution to approve the funding for these projects (recommended option)

This will allow these projects to continue and/or commence, ensuring we can improve water resilience in a number of high risk and relatively straight forward areas.

This option does not preclude Council accepting external funding. Council expects to receive advice on this early November.

Reason for the recommendation

It is the writers understanding that Council wanted these water resilience projects funded and delivered irrespective to whether external funding is sourced.

3) Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

This report is requesting an amended resolution for unbudgeted capital funding to support the following projects to be delivered in 2020/2021 year:

Project

Cost

Capital rate impact per SUIP

1. Kaikohe: new bore in the deep aquifer at Monument Hill.

$1,184,000

$30.34

2. Opononi/Omapere: pH treatment at the WTP.

$15,000

$4.50

3. Kawakawa: amend the residual flow consent condition

$70,000

$4.03

4. Paihia: upgrade the intake screen to self-cleaning

$100,000

$3.60

5. Kaitaia: install a permanent weir on the Awanui riverbed.

$150,000

$3.22

6. Kerikeri: install new clarifiers at WTP

$500,000

$11.13

7. All schemes: leak detection equipment

$100,000

 

Total

$2,119,000

 

·              

·             Once work is complete, the assets will be capitalised, and rates will be struck in the following financial year to recover the value of the asset over its lifespan. Water rates are calculated scheme by scheme therefore, the impacts could be expected to be as indicated in the table above. If it was found that the Kawakawa consent work could not be capitalised, then it would result in a $0.03 increase in the operational rate of water.

·              

The leak detection equipment would be apportioned across all schemes as no one scheme benefits solely from the purchase of equipment.

Attachments

1.      2020-08-25 Council Report Unbudgeted Funds Approved for 20_21 - A2986350  


 

Compliance schedule:

Full consideration has been given to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 S77 in relation to decision making, in particular:

1.      A Local authority must, in the course of the decision-making process,

a)      Seek to identify all reasonably practicable options for the achievement of the objective of a decision; and

b)      Assess the options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

c)       If any of the options identified under paragraph (a) involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

2.      This section is subject to Section 79 - Compliance with procedures in relation to decisions.

 

Compliance requirement

Staff assessment

State the level of significance (high or low) of the issue or proposal as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

Low.

State the relevant Council policies (external or internal), legislation, and/or community outcomes (as stated in the LTP) that relate to this decision.

N/A

State whether this issue or proposal has a District wide relevance and, if not, the ways in which the appropriate Community Board’s views have been sought.

This issue is of District Wide relevance.

State the possible implications for Māori and how Māori have been provided with an opportunity to contribute to decision making if this decision is significant and relates to land and/or any body of water.

N/A

Identify persons likely to be affected by or have an interest in the matter, and how you have given consideration to their views or preferences (for example – youth, the aged and those with disabilities.

N/A

State the financial implications and where budgetary provisions have been made to support this decision.

As detailed in the report.

Chief Financial Officer review.

Type here

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

6.6         Setting of 2021 Meeting schedule

File Number:           A2952548

Author:                    Rhonda-May Whiu, Elected Member Administrator

Authoriser:              William J Taylor MBE, General Manager - Corporate Services

 

Purpose of the Report

To provide a draft 2021 calendar of Council and Committee meetings to Council for adoption.

Executive Summary

·        The attached draft calendar proposes the adoption of dates for Council and Committee meetings, Workshops, and meetings for Long-Term Plan consultation.

·        The draft calendar proposes Council and Committee meetings (excluding Executive Review Committee) will be scheduled every six weeks.

·        Executive Review Committee are scheduled monthly.

·        Additional May Council meeting timed for Long-Term Plan Deliberations.

·        Additional June Council Meeting timed for adoption of the Long-Term Plan.

·        Additional October Council Meeting timed for the adoption of the Annual Report.

 

Recommendation

That Council adopt the 2021 calendar as attached.

 

1) Background

The Local Government Act (LGA) requires a local authority to hold meetings that are necessary for the good governance of its region or district. The Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act (LGOIMA) promotes the open and public transaction of business at meetings. Neither the LGA or LGOIMA requires a local authority to schedule meetings a year in advance, however it is considered good practise throughout New Zealand.

Council reserve 28 October of each year, as a non-Council meeting day, in recognising the signing of He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni – Declaration of Independence of the United Tribes of New Zealand, as the National day set aside to observe New Zealand Wars.

Reports will be submitted to the Community Board meetings. Community Boards that wish to meet every 6 weeks to align with the Council and those on a six weekly cycle will be requested to hold their meetings two weeks before Committee and two weeks after Council. The Community Board dates are not included on the attachment as they are subject to their approval.

 

2) Discussion and Options

This report suggests that all meetings and Workshops be held at Far North District Council headquarters in Kaikohe. The Far North District Council does not own any suitable buildings elsewhere. While it is and has been possible, hosting meetings elsewhere comes with an increase in cost and cannot be supported to the same level that is possible at the Kaikohe headquarters. If there is a desire to hold meetings elsewhere consideration needs to be given to what value this would add to the decision-making process.

Council and Committee meetings are currently held on a six-weekly rotation. This report proposes that Council meetings be held on Thursdays six weekly, that committee meetings be split between Tuesday and Wednesday six weekly and the Executive Review Committee on a Tuesday monthly till September before aligning with the six-week cycle.

Workshops have been scheduled for 2021 based on the current years demand and may also be used for Elected Member training and development days. Workshop half days have been scheduled to utilise some of the time when committee meetings only require part of the day.

A calendar is attached to provide a visual aid of the schedule. The calendar includes dates for Council, Committee, Workshops, and Long-Term Plan consultation. While decisions are not made at workshops and are informal information or briefing sessions, they have been included in this calendar. Attendance at workshops is considered mandatory. Including them in the calendar provides a full summary of meetings requiring elected member attendance and provides members the opportunity to plan other commitments.

Please note, additional time may be required from time to time for unexpected or unanticipated matters. This should however be minimal. Staff are committed to providing as much notice as possible and making sure that business where possible, is restricted to the days adopted as part of this schedule.

Statutory documents require adoption at the end of February, June and October. To achieve this additional Council meetings has been scheduled in June and October.

The proposed dates following a six weekly cycle are as follows:

Council from 10am

Strategy & Policy from 9:30am

Regulatory Compliance

From 1pm

Infrastructure

From 9:30am

Assurance, Risk & Finance from 1pm

Executive Review from 9.00am

25 February

9 February

9 February

10 February

10 February

2 February

8 April

23 March

23 March

24 March

24 March

9 March

13 May

4 May

4 May

5 May

5 May

13 April

20 May

15 June

15 June

16 June

16 June

11 May

24 June

20 July

20 July

21 July

21 July

8 June

1 July

7 September

7 September

8 September

8 September

13 July

12 August

19 October

19 October

20 October

20 October

10 August

23 September

30 November

30 November

1 December

1 December

13 September

27 October

 

 

 

 

12 October

4 November

 

 

 

 

13 November

16 December

 

 

 

 

 

 

2021 Workshop dates are proposed for:

January 28

February 11, 16, 17, 18, 24

March 10, 11, 17, 18, 31

April 14, 15, 28, 29

May 11, 19, 25, 26, 27

June 8, 9, 10, 23, 30

July 6, 27, 28, 29

August 10, 18, 19, 25, 26

September 14, 16, 22, 29, 30

October 13, 14, 21

November 10, 18, 24, 25

December 9, 15

Reason for the recommendation

To adopt a schedule of meetings and workshops for the 2021 calendar year.

3) Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

There is a cost in supporting meetings, and these are covered within operational budgets.

Attachments

1.      Meeting and Workshop Calendar 2021 - A2987297  

 

Compliance schedule:

Full consideration has been given to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 S77 in relation to decision making, in particular:

1.      A Local authority must, in the course of the decision-making process,

a)      Seek to identify all reasonably practicable options for the achievement of the objective of a decision; and

b)      Assess the options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

c)       If any of the options identified under paragraph (a) involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

2.      This section is subject to Section 79 - Compliance with procedures in relation to decisions.

 

Compliance requirement

Staff assessment

State the level of significance (high or low) of the issue or proposal as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

This matter is of low significance.

State the relevant Council policies (external or internal), legislation, and/or community outcomes (as stated in the LTP) that relate to this decision.

The relevant legislation as referenced in the report is the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

State whether this issue or proposal has a District wide relevance and, if not, the ways in which the appropriate Community Board’s views have been sought.

Community Boards are responsible for setting their own meeting schedule. Similar reports will be written suggesting alignment with Council and Committee meetings.

State the possible implications for Māori and how Māori have been provided with an opportunity to contribute to decision making if this decision is significant and relates to land and/or any body of water.

There are no particular implications for Māori.

Identify persons likely to be affected by or have an interest in the matter, and how you have given consideration to their views or preferences (for example – youth, the aged and those with disabilities.

This report does not have any implications on persons identified in legislation.

State the financial implications and where budgetary provisions have been made to support this decision.

Financial implications are covered within operational budgets.

Chief Financial Officer review.

The CFO has not reviewed this report.

 

 



Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

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Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

6.7         Formal Appointments of Councillors

File Number:           A2977051

Author:                    Aisha Huriwai, Team Leader Democracy Services

Authoriser:              William J Taylor MBE, General Manager - Corporate Services

 

Purpose of the Report

To formally confirm appointments of Council representatives.

Executive Summary

12 months into the current term members have expressed interest in making some slight changes to their formal appointments. This report recommends these appointments for Council approval.

 

Recommendation

That Council appoint:

a)      Councillor Smith to the Assurance, Risk and Finance Committee

b)      Councillor Smith to the Infrastructure Committee

c)      Councillor Stratford to the Strategy and Policy Committee

d)      Councillor Clendon to the Bay of Islands-Whangaroa Community Board

e)      Councillors Vujcich and _________ as the sister city representatives.

 

1) Background

Over the years the Far North District Council has developed relationships with various groups. In some instances, Council is legislatively obligated to participate in a governance role, in other instances groups have invited Council to their governance table. Appointing Elected Members to each of these groups provides a mechanism for engagement between Council and each group. All of the appointments included in this report sit within the Far North District Council with the intention of building relationships and providing oversight of our own internal operations.

This report suggests making further appointments to those resolved in December 2019.

Under section 41A of the Local Government Act the Mayor has powers to establish Committees and appoint the Chairperson of a Committee, but there is no specific legislation which states that the Mayor can appoint members to Committees or to various roles. However, section 31 of the Local Government Act specifically covers appointing members to Committees.

2) Discussion and Options

The Bay of Islands-Whangaroa Community Board have confirmed their desire to have a second Councillor appointed to their Board and it is understood that Councillor Clendon is happy to fill this appointment.

Appointment

Member

Staff comment

Assurance Risk and Finance Committee

Councillor Smith

All Councillors are invited to attend all Committee meetings. Formally appointing Councillor Smith would give her voting rights.

As Chair of the Strategy and Policy Committee there are a number of overlaps with other Committee business including the Assurance Risk and Finance Committee.

This appointment would increase the membership to 10 members. Quorum is 4.

Infrastructure Committee

Councillor Smith

All Councillors are invited to attend all Committee meetings. Formally appointing Councillor Smith would give her voting rights.

This appointment would increase the membership to 10 members. Quorum is 5.

Strategy and Policy Committee

Councillor Stratford

All Councillors are invited to attend all Committee meetings. Formally appointing Councillor Stratford would give her voting rights.

This appointment would increase the membership to 10 members. Quorum of this committee is 5 members.

Bay of Islands-Whangaroa Community Board

Councillor Clendon

Councillors Smith and Stratford had been appointed as Council representatives on the Community Board. Councillor Stratford resigned in August 2020 and the Community Board Chairperson has confirmed that the Board would like a second appointment to be confirmed.

Sister City Representatives

Councillors Vujcich and _____________

In the previous triennium Council had 2 members appointed to a sister city portfolio. There were discussions at the start of the term about including sister cities in the Economic Development portfolio. Councillor Vujcich holds this appointment but it has not been included in the scope. Council have 3 sister city relationships. The Strategy and Policy Committee are responsible for monitoring and oversight over relationships including sister cities. Any reporting on these appointments would be through that Committee.

Reason for the recommendation

To formalise appointments.

3) Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

There are no financial implications or need for budgetary provision.

Attachments

Nil


 

Compliance schedule:

Full consideration has been given to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 S77 in relation to decision making, in particular:

1.      A Local authority must, in the course of the decision-making process,

a)      Seek to identify all reasonably practicable options for the achievement of the objective of a decision; and

b)      Assess the options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

c)       If any of the options identified under paragraph (a) involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga.

2.      This section is subject to Section 79 - Compliance with procedures in relation to decisions.

 

Compliance requirement

Staff assessment

State the level of significance (high or low) of the issue or proposal as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

This report is of low significance.

State the relevant Council policies (external or internal), legislation, and/or community outcomes (as stated in the LTP) that relate to this decision.

As referenced in the report there

State whether this issue or proposal has a District wide relevance and, if not, the ways in which the appropriate Community Board’s views have been sought.

The recommendation in this report affects the district and is a governance decision.

State the possible implications for Māori and how Māori have been provided with an opportunity to contribute to decision making if this decision is significant and relates to land and/or any body of water.

There are no implications on Māori.

Identify persons likely to be affected by or have an interest in the matter, and how you have given consideration to their views or preferences (for example – youth, the aged and those with disabilities.

Staff understand that the members and chairpersons of the meetings support the recommendations contained in this report.

State the financial implications and where budgetary provisions have been made to support this decision.

There are no financial implications or need for budgetary provision.

Chief Financial Officer review.

The Chief Financial Officer has not reviewed this report.

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

7          Information Reports

7.1         CEO Report to Council 01 July 2020 - 31 August 2020

File Number:           A2955403

Author:                    Sam Chapman, Accounting Support Officer

Authoriser:              Emma Healy, Executive Officer

  

Purpose of the Report

The purpose of the report is to present the CEO Report to Council: 1 July 2020 to 31 August 2020 for Council’s consideration.

Executive Summary

The CEO Report to Council is a summary of Council activities, presenting an overview across all activities that Council undertakes. We have placed emphasis on relevant issues and pressures Council is experiencing whilst meeting its objectives to the community.

Recommendation

That the Council receive the report “CEO Report to Council 01 July 2020 - 31 August 2020“.

 

Background

The CEO Report to Council is attached and covers a detailed overview of progress against Council’s activities. His Worship the Mayor and Councillors’ feedback is welcomed.

Discussion and Next Steps

This report is for information only.

Financial Implications and Budgetary Provision

There are no financial implications or budgetary provision needed as a result of this report.

Attachments

1.      CEO Report to Council_1 July 2020 - 31 August 2020 - A2959212  

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda

29 October 2020

 

 

 

FNDC Horizontal Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chief Executive Officer’s Report to Council

 

Period: 1 July 2020 31 August 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key Work Plan Areas:

Governance

CEO Office

Strategy

Corporate Operations

Infrastructure and Asset Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

Welcome to this CEO report, which provides an overview on the Council’s activities for the period 1 July 2020 – 31 August 2020.


Welcome to the latest summary report of Council activities

 

 

Introduction from Shaun Clarke, Chief Executive

 

The first of July 2020 marked the beginning of another financial and performance year and offered the opportunity to take stock not only of what we had achieved last year, but also what we need to achieve for this year.  Top of mind for me, and for all of us, has been how we build resilience into our water supplies, encourage economic recovery in a COVID-19 environment, deliver our capital works programme, and continue to keep our focus on Creating Great Places and Supporting Our People.

 

In terms of water, the Far North went from experiencing drought earlier this year to an extreme weather event in July when there was widespread rainfall across the region.  From Wednesday 15 July to Saturday 18 July some areas experience more than 180mm of rainfall.  Intense thunderstorms and heavy rain were felt across the region and as a result State Highway one, ten and twelve were blocked in numerous places.  A number of Council roads were also blocked by flood waters, slips and downed trees. The impacts of this weather event were particularly felt by communities in Puketona, Moerewa and Waikare.  Central government set up a $30,000 Mayoral Relief Fund for Northland, to be used for those experiencing resulting hardship and it has been used to support a number of whānau in the region. 

 

On 8 July, the Prime Minister and the Minister of Local Government announced a three-year programme for reforming three waters service delivery arrangements, to be delivered in parallel with an economic stimulus package of Crown investment.  The investment package recognises that COVID-19 has put additional pressure on local government, and that the financial pressures councils are under may result in reductions to planned maintenance and renewal of infrastructure precisely when the economy needs a boost to protect and create local jobs.  The package is structured to allocate money at both a local and regional level.  The Far North District Council agreed to participate in the first phase of the three waters services reform programme.

 

New Zealand had experienced 102 days without community transmission of COVID-19, however in August Auckland experienced an outbreak.  Consequently, on 12 August Auckland went into Level 3 restrictions with the rest of New Zealand returning to Level 2 restrictions.  Travel restrictions and Tai Tokerau’s proximity to Auckland once again meant the impacts of COVID-19 were felt across the District. 

 

Central government funding for infrastructure investment continued and during this period $7 million was confirmed for a Council-led project to build a cycle trail and shared path linking Ahipara, Kaitaia, Awanui to Te One Roa A Tohe (90 Mile Beach) and Te Rerenga Wairua (Cape Reinga).  Kerikeri received $8 million in funding for recreational amenities. Of this, $3 million was earmarked to improve Kerikeri Domain in line with its Reserve Management Plan, while $2 million will help develop sports fields and facilities at a new site in Waipapa. Another $2.45 million will help redevelop a jetty and boat ramp at Rangitane, while $550,000 will go towards a sculpture commissioned by Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Rēhia. Designed by Chris Booth, Te Haa o Te Ao (The Breath of the World) aims to raise awareness about climate change.  $1 million was allocated to the development of Animal Shelters.  This investment in our District will make it easier to do business here, increase our employment opportunities and help our economy weather the COVID-19 global downturn.

 

The start of a new performance year saw staff assess their performance over the preceding twelve months and develop new annual Key Performance Indicators.  Our focus on supporting our people meant we have also had a focus on staff having professional development plans.  We also had the opportunity to recognise individuals in our IT team, Democracy Services and Customer Services for going above and beyond through the Love Your Work awards.

 

As a Progressive Council, we maintained a focus on digital ways of working captured in the Creating Great Workplaces initiative.  An evaluation of the initiative to date found there were productivity and wellbeing gains that could form part of our operation rhythm.  Engagement was enhanced with a staff reference group being initiated, and three important leadership qualities when working in a digital environment were identified – People First, Agility and Accountability.  Attention was turned to what future office space requirements should be if we continue to work in a more flexible and digital manner.

 

With the Annual Plan having been set, focus turned to the Long Term Plan (LTP) with seven workshops being held during this reporting period to establish strategic priorities and seek capital works direction and input.  A digital Elected Member lounge was developed to support their engagement on the LTP.  Council also launched an election system survey asking residents to choose how the Mayor, Councillors and Community Boards are elected, giving the two voting systems – First Past the Post (FPP) which is the current system, or Single Transferable Voting (STV).  A total of 637 submissions were received with 406 opting for STV, and 231 preferring to remain with FPP.  Based on this, Council voted to switch to STV on 13 August.

 

Achievements during this reporting period include:

·    Commencing conversations with Elected Members on their personal professional development planning.

·    Adoption of the Nothing But Net Far North digital strategy.

·    The ICT teams from the four Northland Councils have joined together to form the ‘Northland Digital Collaboration Alliance’, initially focusing on cybersecurity knowledge sharing and collaboration.

·    The removal of remaining water restrictions in the district.

·    e-LIM applications being made available online to the public.

·    The My FNDC portal went live allowing members of the public to lodge a request for service online including via mobile devices. 

·    Launched in July, the public can now pay their infringements online through the FNDC website.

·    Community Boards agreed to the 2020/21 New Footpaths Programmes.

 

Operational performance during this period saw:

·    19.35% decrease in financial counter stats for Service Centres.

·    31.90% increase in visitors to Service Centres.

·    3.72% decrease in calls to the Contact Centre.

·    11.50% increase in AskUs emails.

·    9.09% decrease in Building Inspection bookings.

·    8% decrease in i-Site visitor numbers.

·    21% increase in i-Site retail revenue.

·    17% decrease in i-Site transaction spend.

·    4% decrease in i-Site transaction numbers.

 

·    12.4% decrease in eBook and audiobook downloads reflecting less eBook use post-lockdown

·    46.96% increase in library website sessions reflecting increased customer familiarity with the new system

 

Also of note:

·    1,764 Requests for Service were received by Environmental Services and 1,786 were closed

·    885 Requests for Service were received by Animal Management with 98% responded to on time

·    83 dogs were impounded across the District with five dogs rehomed through the Council’s website and six dogs transferred to the Bay of Islands Animal Rescue for re-homing.

·    4 infringements were issued to dog owners for offences

·    181 noise complaints were received

·    92 Parking Infringements issued with a total $ value of $2,740

·    90 swimming pools inspections were carried out with a 50% fail rate

·    62 Building WOF audits were undertaken

·    228 RFS’ were received by Building Compliance

·    32 Notices to Fix were issued for breaches of the Building Act

·    7 Infringements were issued for building-related breaches 

·    A further 10 exemptions were issued, and eight Certificate of Acceptance approved

·    171 resource consent applications were received

·    An average of 84.5% of resource consents processed within statutory timeframes

·    300 building consents were received

·    The BCA issued 219 building consents

·    98.78% of building consents were issued within the legislative timeframe of twenty working days.

·    Hokianga Ferry (Kohu Ra Tuarua) revenue received for July was $ $33,966.44


 

Governance

 

Local Body Elections

 

The by-election to fill the vacancy in the Whatuwhiwhi subdivision commenced during the period. Voting closes as at midday on Thursday 17 September and results announced thereafter. There are four candidates in the running:

 

·    Eddie Bellas

·    Boyd Rupapera

·    Whetu Rutene

·    Bill Subritzky

 

 

Elected Member Professional Development Plans

 

At the CEO’s request, in late July an invitation was extended by the General Manager - Corporate Services to the Mayor and Councillors to participate in a professional development conversation. The intent of the conversation was to discuss an individual development plan for 2020-21 to ensure Members are being supported with the appropriate development and training opportunities for their role as an Elected Member, but also as either Chair or member of Committees, or as a Portfolio Holder.

 

The response was very positive and those who took up the invitation had discussions during the month of August. Individual plans have been set for those Members, provided to them and bookings are already underway at the time of writing this report.

 

It is recognised that not all Elected Members wish to have formalised professional development at this stage, but opportunities will be provided to all in terms of Te Ao Maori and Governance Basics in this financial year.

 

We decided to check with LGNZ Equip regarding the approach we adopted and they support the proactive way in which we are working with Members to provide a bespoke training and development package.

 

Looking ahead, an invitation will be sent out in April/May 2021, inviting the Mayor and Councillors once again to discuss their development needs for the upcoming financial year. This will allow time for appropriate development interventions to be researched, budgeted for and set for 2021-2022.

 


 

CEO Office

 

People and Capability

 

Annual Competency Reviews

 

The first of July saw the start of annual competency reviews for all FNDC employees. This is stage three implementation of the framework that was introduced in 2019 to provide consistency and transparency in remuneration across the organisation. These reviews are linked to individual development plans to ensure that the competency of all our people enables them to achieve or exceed their performance goals.

 

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) Performance Goals FY 20/21

 

KPIs for this financial year are approaching completion across all groups. Unlike previous years, these KPIs are required to accommodate the uncertainties brought about by COVID-19. This will be done by formally reviewing the goals set every 90 days to allow for any changes in focus. These reviews will be initiated by our performance management system, Mariner 7, which will capture and record details throughout the financial year.

 

Infrastructure & Asset Management Services

 

Leadership support for the asset management and infrastructure planning teams has been provided through a consultant filling in for a vacant leadership position in the group. The arrangement is being reviewed mid-September.  A Manager – Major & Recovery Projects position was created and a staff member from this group seconded into the role to oversee the delivery of infrastructure projects that have received government funding. 

 

Remote Leadership Capabilities

 

Supporting leaders in the Council transition to flexible / remote working is a key focus for the Great Workplaces project team. A workshop has been developed that looks at three key leadership capabilities; People First, Agile and Accountable with a focus on supporting remote teams. Invitations for this workshop have been sent for late September when it is hoped that all leaders will attend.

 

Corporate Services Group

 

It is proposed that the Manager – Business Development will be transferred to the Infrastructure and Asset Management Group, so that support is in place for shovel ready projects. The key responsibilities and accountabilities are being finalised for this important role.

 

District Services Group

 

The team reporting to the Team Leader – Building Consents Support, who sadly passed away, have been distributed amongst the leadership team within the department. Feedback received has suggested that staff are feeling supported and are aligned with the functions they now report to.

 

Creating Great Workplaces – Employee Engagement Group

 

People & Capability are coordinating the Employee Engagement Group for the employment relations workstream generated by the Creating Great Workplaces project. Membership of the group has been confirmed, comprising of Tier 3 & 4 leaders, PSA and Employee Reference Group staff members.

 

 

 

Staffing, Salaries and Training

 

 

Current Staffing Levels

 

Actual Full Time Equivalent (FTE) at 31 August 2020

Annual Plan Establishment (FTE)

345.59

377

 

 

Salaries and Training 2019-2020

 

Financial Performance
as at 31 August 2020

YTD Actual

YTD
Budget

YTD
Actual vs
Budget

Annual Budget

Salary Costs

$4,551,036

$4,686,482

$135,446

$30,452,195

Training Costs

$56,199

$114,074

$57,875

$901,179

Trainings as a % of Salaries
(Sector average is 4%)

1.2%

 

 

3.0%

 

 

Vacancies

 

Department

Vacancies currently being Advertised / Pending (FTE)

FTE Available

CEO/Communications/People & Capabilities

3

2

Corporate Services

5

5.3

District Services

7

13.03

Infrastructure & Asset Management/NTA

6

9.8

Strategic Planning & Policy

2

2

FNDC TOTAL (FTE) * inc part time & full-time permanent staff

25

32.13

 


 

Customer Service

 

Customer Experience Programme

 

Closed Requests For Service (RFS) – Customer Satisfaction Index (CSI)

 

The scores provided below are for the four months ending 31 August. Since COVID-19 we have seen a significant drop in our response rates. The CSI data includes responses from May when we had returned to our normal operating rhythm however our customers feedback behaviors have changed and our response rates have dropped significantly which maybe affecting the ratings (for example we currently have 313 responses in this sample compared to 553 at this time last year). We have experienced this drop across all our CSI Programmes.

 

Our response levels:

 

·       Overall CSI for Requests for Service: 76.2 (0.13% increase)

·       Overall satisfaction making the request: 77.3% (1.16% decrease)

·       CSI for requests made via the After-Hours provider: 66 (18.18% decrease)

·       CSI for library services: 91 (1.32% decrease)

·       CSI for visits to i-SITEs and Service Centres: 98.9 (0.2% decrease)

 

 

Monthly CSI Trend for closed Requests for Service:

             

 

 

N.B. Performance indicators for the most resent reporting month should be interpreted with extreme caution because of survey response time lag (3-4 weeks).


 

Other measurement programmes

 

The scores provided below are for the six months ending 31 August. As noted above we currently have approximately half of the responses compared to this time last year (building inspections services were affected by lockdown).

 

Our response levels:

·    CSI for Building Inspection Services: 57.2 (21.96% increase)

·    CSI for Building Consent Process: 67.5 (2.96% decrease)

·    CSI for Resource Consent Process: 66.3 (3.77% decrease)

 

The current focus of the Customer Experience Improvement Programme is being reviewed to ensure alignment with other organisation initiatives:

·    Ensuring a customer focus during Great Workplaces remote working changes

·    Investigating tools and methods to gather and utilise customer feedback to improve the customers’ experience

·    Developing a programme of work to ensure customer experiences are improved by our processes and systems

·    Implementing system improvements following the Transport team customer journey diagnostics

 


 

Health, Safety & Wellbeing (HSW)

 

Summary of Activities

 

•      Continued re-supply of COVID-19 pandemic personal protective equipment and office hygiene items to staff who work in the field or who have transitioned back to office work throughout the reporting period.

•      Workplace First Aid (Level 2) training and certification delivered 20 front line staff while in Alert Level 1.

•      Ongoing HSW support to Creating & Enabling Great Workplaces, with coordination of ergonomic furniture to remote working staff and specialist Health & Safety advice in policy development.

•      H&S inspections undertaken at the Broadway Swing Bridge and Kerikeri Water Treatment Plant with Infrastructure Capital Works team and contract partners.

•      Lone Worker Safety Solutions & Vehicle GPS Project contract was awarded to Direct Safety Limited and eRoad (joint bid). Commencement of project delivery well underway and on track at time of this report being written.

 

PeopleSafe Stories Types during the reporting period

  

 

 

During the two-month reporting period there were 19 PeopleSafe incidents/events told, covering 27 story types. The average number of incidents per month continues to drop and sits at seven incidents/month. With staff continuing to return to pre COVID-19 lockdown roles, reporting has increased compared to the May-June reporting period and that trend has continued.

 


Communications

 

The Annual Plan 2020/21, COVID-19 economic recovery funding and the mid-July storm were focus areas for the Communications Team during July and August. Key outputs included:

 

·    Nineteen media releases. Three of these were about the Te Hiku Community Board byelection and three were about the impact the storm in mid-July had on Council infrastructure.  The rest were about:

 

·    The Adoption of the Annual Plan 2020/21

·    The scrapping of library fines for children and teenagers

·    A community survey about whether to replace the First Past the Post (FPP) electoral system with Single Transferable Voting (STV)

·    Plans to develop public access to a boat ramp at Rangitoto/Windsor Landing

·    The closure of the Hundertwasser Toilets for repairs

·    The removal of remaining water restrictions in the district

·    Government plans to allocate another $9 million to infrastructure projects in the district

·    The commissioning of Kerikeri’s new water treatment plant

·    Plans to suppress dust on 56 roads this summer

·    Council support for a new fire station at Karikari peninsula

·    Council support for a playground planned for Kerikeri Sports Complex

 

·    Responding to 50 media enquiries. The top three topics of enquiry were the impact the mid-July storm had on Council infrastructure, dog control issues and Council water supplies

 

·    Eleven mayoral blogs/newspaper columns about the Annual Plan, survey on whether to introduce STV voting, COVID-19 economic recovery funding, the storm in mid-July, CouncilMARK, the COVID-19 pandemic and the Innovating Streets Fund

 

·    Six, full-page newspaper adverts about the Annual Plan 2020/21, electoral system survey and the Council’s COVID-19 economic recovery projects

 

·    One, four-page newsletter for inclusion with the first rates bills of 2020/21

 

·    Fifty-five Facebook posts, helping to increase the number of people who ‘like’ the Council’s Facebook page to 5,727 people

 

·    Nine editions of The Weekender, a weekly summary of key Council achievements and economic recovery news

 

·    Weekly Chief Executive communications to staff.

 

 


 

Strategy

 

Corporate Planning

 

Long Term Plan (LTP)

 

Although the LTP was underway early this year, the COVID-19 lockdown prompted a re-think due to time lost to final Annual Plan adjustments. Since adopting the Annual Plan, the LTP pace has increased substantially, with seven workshops held during July and August 2020 to establish strategic priorities and seek capital works direction and input.

 

Early engagement planning has been progressing in the background, with the development of digital tools to enable focused collaboration with Elected Members without the need for excessive workshops. Lounge material was developed in a dual-purpose manner to facilitate quick transition to community engagement.

Soft LTP engagement is due to begin in the first week of October 2020, with three topics:

·    Community outcomes aligned with the four aspects of community wellbeing

·    The six key issues facing the District that the LTP needs to begin addressing over the next ten years with planned key interventions

·    Options for the rates review – the pros and cons of a number of changes we could propose in formal consultation

Infrastructure and Financial Strategies have progressed significantly alongside the development of opex budget packs that will be the subject of work in September and October, heading towards establishing a proposed financial position by mid-November. The plan is to achieve audit readiness by mid-December before Audit activities begin in January next year.

 


 

Strategy Development, Bylaws and Policies

 

Far North 2100 District Strategy

 

On 16 June 2020 staff took the community board members in attendance at the combined community board meeting through the Microsoft SharePoint Far North 2100 website. The site was left open for feedback from the community board members for ten days following the workshop.

 

After discussion with members of Te Kahu o Taonui staff decided to approach the iwi chairs and Chief Executive Officers for their support in principle for Far North 2100. A paper was developed for Te Kahu o Taonui explaining Far North 2100 and how this is a prerequisite for near term and long-term strategic infrastructure and land use planning for Council. The paper is scheduled to be presented by Far North District Council Rangatira to Te Kahu o Taonui on 8 September 2020.

 

The approach to the development of Far North 2100, a strategy for the District, will continue as follows;

 

·    hui with iwi/hapū partners that will utilise a live illustration method to develop objectives and strategic opportunities.

·    the development of a draft Far North 2100 Strategy to be endorsed by iwi/ hapū prior to approval by the Strategy and Policy Committee to go out for public consultation. and

·    public consultation on a draft Far North 2100 Strategy

 

 

Transport Strategy

 

The Draft Integrated Transport Strategy Programme Business Case was revised in July 2020 to satisfy New Zealand Transport Agency’s review. The updated Programme Business Case was then issued to Elected Members.

 

The ten-year cost staging of the recommended programme of work was adjusted to accommodate affordability concerns in the first three years arising post-drought, post-pandemic and from Northland Transport Alliance indications regarding the need for substantial further investment in maintenance operations and renewals.

 

The programme of work is now being considered as part of the Long Term Plan transport capital programme workshops.

 

 

Climate Change

 

With the adoption of the Far North District Council Climate Change Roadmap on 7 May 2020 staff have progressed the following initiatives identified in the roadmap;

 

·    Continued with the development of a baseline carbon footprint for Council that will be used to inform a carbon footprint reduction programme for the 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

·    Seeking advice on the financial and legal risk to Council as a result of climate change. This advice will initiate and inform the development of policy that will guide and include climate change in Council decision making processes.

·    Increased the Far North District Council’s involvement in the development of a regional adaptation strategy by including staff from the Te Hono Department on the Climate Adaptation Te Tai Tokerau Group which includes representatives from all the Councils in the Northland Region.

On 30 July 2020 the Strategy and Policy Committee approved Councillor Clendon as the Far North District Council representative and Councillor Stratford as an alternative on the Joint Committee of the Councils in Northland that will oversee regional climate change adaptation strategy development and the execution of the resulting work programmes across the Northland Region. The Strategy and Policy Committee also resolved to ask Te Kahu o Taonui to nominate a representative and alternative as the Far North District tangata whenua representative on the Joint Committee of Councils.

 

 

Regional Accessibility Strategy

 

Initial scoping of a project to create a Regional Accessibility Strategy commenced in July 2020. This project is being led by Whangarei District Council.

 

 

Bylaw Programme

 

During the reporting period staff continued to research and review the core problems and issues that were covered in the bylaws that were identified as revoked in April 2019. This research has included extensive interviews with internal subject matter experts as well as the engagement of external legal and subject matter experts. This research is considering what was regulated in the following revoked and due to be reviewed bylaws;

·    Control of the use public places 2010.

·    Keeping of animals, poultry and bees 2007.

·    Vehicles on beaches 2015. This review is aligned with the implementation of the Te Oneroa a Tohe beach management plan.

 

As per the resolution of the 21 May 2020 Council meeting staff have continued to work on statement of proposals and draft bylaws that will address the problems regulated in the following revoked bylaws;

·    Council controlled parks and reserves.

·    Vehicle crossings.

·    Trading in public places.

Staff have continued the planning and initial research to create new bylaws that will replace the following bylaws whose review dates have now passed;

·    The Parking and Traffic Control Bylaw.

·    The Water Supply Bylaw.

 

Staff at the Northland Transport Alliance have continued to revise the roll out of speed limit signage across the Okaihau-Kaeo-Waimate North Review area. The final recommendation to amend the speed limits bylaw and commence the deployment of the new signage in the review area is now planned to come to the 20 October 2020 Strategy and Policy Committee meeting.

 

 

 

Iwi/ Hapū Relationships

 

As part of Council’s review of its electoral options, staff ran a workshop on Māori representation. The workshop included reading material and invited guest speakers. This was the second of three workshops aimed at providing Council with information around electoral options and Māori elected members of Council.

 

The Te Oneroa-a-Tōhe Board met in August 2020 and endorsed a draft Beach Management Plan. The plan was supported by Council representatives after receiving positive feedback at the July 2020 Council workshop.

 

The Beach Management Plan must now undergo a formal consultation process as stipulated in the Treaty settlement legislation. The consultation period will run for 20 working days, commencing Monday 14 September 2020 and running through to Friday 9 October 2020. Hearings have been scheduled for late October 2020.

 

Staff from across Council have been working closely together on the procurement of Cultural Impact Assessments and tangata whenua engagement for the Kohukohu and Opononi Waste Water Treatment Plants; Kaitaia water resilience project, Matawii water storage, Taipa Waste Water Treatment Plant Environment Court Recommendations – including cultural induction and tangata whenua engagement. 

 

Staff continue to process remission applications and look for opportunities for Māori land development. This includes working closely with the Māori Land Court on issues that impede the development of land and information sharing agreements.

 


 

Community Wellbeing

 

Community Development & Funding

 

Council adopted the Nothing But Net Far North digital strategy at the 13 August Council Meeting and committed to delivering on the strategy as part of the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan.  

 

Staff have received confirmation from America’s Cup Events that all nine communities that self-nominated to host official America’s Cup FanZones in March 2021 have been approved. They are:

 

·    Mangonui Cruising Club

·    Otehei Bay

·    Urupukapuka Island

·    Opua Cruising Club

·    Turner Centre Keriker,

·    Waipapa Business Association and Waipapa Lions Club

·    The Duke Tavern Russell, Business Paihia

·    Bay of Islands Yacht Club Waitangi

·    Towai/Maromaku Residents and Ratepayers Association Towai.

 

Staff will work closely with these communities to ensure these events are successful.

 

The Events Investment and the Infrastructure Grant funding rounds have been completed. Both funds were oversubscribed, and projects funded range from boundary fencing for Matihetihe Marae in the Hokianga to AstroTurf for the Coopers Beach Bowling Club.

 

Staff are working with the Hokianga community to advance the Rawene Campus. Key infrastructure issues have been identified and a way forward has been agreed on by all parties. The aim is to have the campus operational in time for semester one of the new academic year (2021).

 

Staff continue to work with the Towai-Maromaku community to deliver on their community plan projects, including the establishment of a Sunday makers market, a project that has become more urgent due to local job losses caused by COVID-19.

 

 

Community Placemaking

 

Te Hononga will be opened by the Prime Minster on October 9 2020. The latest lockdown has put the pressure on, and a number of staff are working hard on this project to ensure the building, atea, carpark and surrounds are completed in time.

 


 

District Planning

 

Genetic Modified Organisms Environment Court Appeal

 

Far North District Council and Whangarei District Council jointly appealed the new Northland Regional Plan due to the Northland Regional Council’s decision not to regulate genetically modified organisms in the coastal marine area. Federated Farmers and Life Science Network Incorporated withdrew as s247 parties in March. They had supported the lack of regulations and opposed our appeal. Their withdrawal resulted in no other appeal parties supporting the Northland Regional Council’s decision. At the 16 June 2020 Northland Regional Council meeting, a resolution was passed to settle the Whangarei and Far North District Council’s appeal, by agreeing to regulate the use of genetically modified organisms in the coastal marine area.

 

The Environment Court issued a consent notice on 5 August 2020 identifying that the parties have now agreed that the appeal can be resolved by amending the provisions governing genetically modified organisms in the Proposed Regional Plan. This successful appeal has enabled a consistent management framework for Northland’s territorial authorities and regional council. The pathway of the appeal represents an outcome achieved a lesser financial cost to Council as the matter did not have to be heard by an Environment Court Judge, nor can any further appeal now be lodged.

 

 

Plan Review

 

Development of the new District Plan

 

Further development of the new District Plan progressed through August 2020 including a second workshop with Elected Members to provide increased awareness and understanding of draft proposed tangata whenua provisions, including a Māori purpose zone, statutory acknowledgement areas and frameworks for papakainga housing.

 

Work, which is continuing on the rural environment, will be presented to Elected Members in workshops in September, October and November 2020. This will include reference to the proposed new National Policy Statement Highly Productive Land (NPS HPL) that will not be gazetted until April 2021, but the likely policy direction will be represented in the proposed horticulture zone for the rural environment.

 

 

Operative Digital District Plan

 

New National Planning Standards require an integrated GIS District Plan within five years. The new District Plan is being authored in a digital plan format that complies with the new planning standard. The operative plan is being moved into the same format to provide earlier realisation of customer service benefits. This will assist duty plan queries which average 5000 calls per annum.

 

The transition of the operative plan to the digital format took a large step in August 2020 with the integration of the plan text with plan maps. This means that the operative digital plan will be fully searchable and can have provisions filtered to property level via integrated GIS.

 

The digital format will be shown at a Practitioners meeting in September 2020 to allow for awareness of the new format ahead of being made available to the public before the end of the year.

 


Northland Forward Together

 

The key priorities for the CEs and Mayoral Forums are; the government waters reforms, climate change, regional economic development and further enhancements to the Northland Transport Alliance. Keen interest is also given to; solid waste and upcoming reforms in the sector.

Three carry over projects from the previous financial year; PGF and government funding, Digital Enablement and Regional ICT continue to be progressed and monitored. The CEs and Mayoral Forums also are keen to progress two regional strategies; Regional Economic Development and a Regional Accessibility Strategy.

 

Below is a snapshot of the ten work streams and the progress that has been made since previously reported.

·              

·             Prioritised Projects

·             Lead Council

·             Status

·             Progress made and actions

·             1

·             Four Waters

·             WDC

·             In progress

·             Key Priorities are: Government Three Waters Reform and Potential Amalgamation.

·              

·             In July 2020 government released the Three Waters Reform Programme.  The Government/Local Government Joint Steering Committee hosted an event to take Northland Councils through the proposed reforms.

·              

·             At the Northland Forward Together/Zone One 28 July 2020 meeting, further details about the reforms were discussed by Malcolm Alexander with a presentation from Whangarei District Council.

·              

·             Tranche One 2020-2021 – Council agreement to Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU), work with government, funding stimulus released to participating Councils and progress sector on entity design consideration.  Government plans to introduce legislation.

·             Tranche Two 2021 - 2022– Councils opt into to multi-regional groupings and commence re-establishment planning and the release of further stimulus funding. 

·             Tranche Three 2022 - 2023 – Formation of new entities and a further release of stimulus funding.

·              

·             The feedback from Elected Members at the meeting supported being in the tent with government, signing the non-binding MOU by the 31 August 2020 timeframe and putting forward a Northland solution that (at this stage) is seen as a better proposition for the Region.

·              

·             Far North District Council has signed an MOU to work with government regarding sector entity design, in return for funding.  A small amount of the funding received by Northland Councils will go towards funding a formal Section 17A service delivery review of the sector.  This will to be undertaken by external consultants in conjunction with Northland Councils.

·              

·             The review will consider suitable service delivery entities for asset owning and non-asset owning delivery of services to the region.

·              

·             2

·             Refining the Northland Transport Alliance (NTA)

·             WDC

·             In progress

·             Key Priorities are: Health and Safety, Human Resources, ICT and Auckland Motorways model

·              

·             ICT Enhancements

·              

·             Prior to COVID-19 lockdown a Proof of Concept (POC) was completed to evaluate the benefits of operating the NTA within a separate Office 365 tenant.  The POC included a subset of the NTA team to ensure there was enough understanding of function required to support the NTA shared environment.  There were two main areas that the POC was aiming to achieve. 

·      The first was to provide the NTA with a single identify with a common email identify given the ongoing confusion with NTA staff with different Council domains interacting with the public. 

·      The second was to ensure that staff within the NTA have a common and easy ways to collaborate with each other with documents and other activities as part of their programmes of work.

·              

·             Several of the NTA staff are still using the O365 environment within some of the members Councils environments due to the COVID-19 lockdown and response. Further discussions are still occurring with next steps post COVID-19 lockdowns.

·              

·             3

·             Climate Change

·             KDC

·             In progress

·             The groups key focus currently is the development of a regional adaptation strategy and the implementation of a regional governance structure.

·             Progress was discussed at the last Mayoral Forum on 25 May 2020, with further consideration to be given to the inclusion of Maori/Iwi.

·             Hazard mapping is also underway particularly the Kaipara Harbour.  Key areas of work are:

·      Risk screening from a Local Government perspective

·      Working with communities to develop long-term adaptation changes re land use

·      Regional Council input to the supply of technical Council

·      Central Government national risk assessment

·              

·             A presentation was made to the Northland Forward Together Zone One workshop 28 July 2020.  This was received with mixed reaction, but was overall supportive.

·             A governance model is to be proposed to the CEs Forum in the first instance.

·              

·             4

·             Regional Economic Development

·             FNDC

·             In Progress

·             The key priority is the re-organisation of Northland Inc. to a Regional Joint CCO.

·             To date NRC, FNDC, and KDC Councils have approved funding for the 20/21 Annual Plan and to include the proposal in their respective Long-Term Plan consultation process. 

·              

·             WDC declined to participate in the re-organisation of Northland Inc. at their Council meeting on 27 August 2020. 

·              

·             Consideration is now being given to Northland Inc. being a Joint CCO with NRC, KDC and NRC.  Initial thought is the financial contributions from each Council would remain the same as the original proposal with discussion in progress regarding shareholding and voting rights.  The structure will enable WDC to become a shareholder in the future.

·              

·             A proposed joint working party is currently being set-up.  That working party will have input into the appointment of Northland Inc directors and input into Northland Inc’s statement of intent for the 2021-2022 financial year.

·              

·             Thought is also been given to the communications and developing a standard Long -Term Plan consultation “piece” that can be utilised by all Councils.

·              

·              

·              

·              

·              

·             Projects Carried over from 2019

·             5

·             PGF and CIP Funded Projects

·             All

·             In progress

·             The key priority is securing PGF and CIP funds for strategic projects and projects that enable employment creation and sustainable business.

·              

·             Key Announcements are:

·             On 1 July 2020 government announced $150M for Northland “Shovel Ready” projects for Northland. 

·              

·             Ngawha Innovation and Enterprise Park

·             $19,500,000

·              

·             Lindvart Park Kaikohe (Shovel Ready)

·             $6,000,000

·      Co-funded with FNDC

·      35 jobs expected

·             Kerikeri Enhancements (Shovel Ready)

·             $9,000,000

·      $3m to rebuild and rejuvenate the Kerikeri Domain

·      $2m to help develop land at Waipapa into sports facilities

·      $1m to create two new animal shelters

·      Far North Holdings Limited: $2.45m to

·         rebuild the Rangitane Wharf

·      NZTA and local stakeholders: $550k to

·         build a sculpture at the entrance to Kerikeri

·      Up to 100 jobs created

·              

·              

·             $14M for the Far North (Shovel Ready and PGF)

·             $14,000,000

·             $10.8M for Shovel Ready Projects

·              

·             $7m to FNDC build a cycle trail and shared path

·             + iwi art at entrance to each town: Up to 80 jobs

·              

·             $1.8m to Hē Korowai to develop sites for 24 houses relocated from Auckland. 26 civil works jobs, +

·             refit of the houses will employ: 10 trade

·             students, 6 tradespeople & 5 support staff.

·              

·             $1m to Far North Holdings to upgrade Pukenui

·             Wharf (Houhora Harbour). 20 jobs across professional and maritime services and construction.

·              

·             $1m to Far North Holdings to upgrade Unahi Wharf (Awanui). 16 jobs

·      Worker Redeployment, $2m – up to 27

·         jobs

·      One Billion Trees projects, $381,550 1BT

·      National Land Transport Fund, $922,000

·         for a new roundabout at the intersection of Mathews Ave and State Highway 1 in

·         Kaitaia.

·          

·             1 Billion Trees for the Hokianga IBT

·             $267,000

·             $267k to Fund a co-ordinator for three years

·              

·             Accord with Te Hiku

·             $8,000,000

·             As part of the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund Foundational Package announced earlier this year, $8 million over two years has been

·             earmarked to support this work programme.

·             Initiatives aimed at improving wellbeing outcomes

·             for Te Hiku whānau, particularly in the response

·             and recovery from COVID -19.

·              

·             Significant Maori Sites in the Far North (PGF)

·             $8,750,000

·             $1.7m to Ōhaeawai Community Cultural Centre to restore and rejuvenate 1845 Battle of Ōhaeawai

·             sites at Ngawha. Around 10 jobs will be created

·             for the work, and further long-term jobs should result through increased visitor numbers

·              

·             $1.67m for Marae renovations at Taheke, Parawhenua, Te Rito and Tuhirangi marae. 33 jobs for local tradespeople and contractors

·              

·             $2.25m grant and loan for Ngāti Rangi Ahuwhenua Trust to establish a mānuka plantation and harvest wild plants

·              

·             $3.2m to Reconnecting Northland Trust for fencing waterways and riparian planting. Jobs mentioned

·             but numbers not specified.

·              

·             $2.0m grant to the Ruapekapeka Trust for signage and Pou at Ruapekapeka historically significant Pa site.

·              

·             Key Announcements from the Crown Infrastructure Partners fund are:

·              

·             Project

·             Total Value of Project

·             Amount being Funded

·             FNDC Jettys

·             $500,000

·             $450,000

·             Animal Shelters

·             $1,000,000

·                         $1,000,000

·             Te Hiku o te Ika Revitalisation (paths and walkways project)

·             $27,900,000

·             $7,000,000

·             Mangonui Waterfront Facilities Enhancements and Regeneration

·             $10,300,000

·             $1,500,000

·             Paihia Waterfront Development

·             $25,000,000

·             $8,000,000

·             Lindvart Park - Sportsville Kaikohe

·             $9,200,000

·             $6,000,000

·             Ruapekapeka Road – sealing corner of SH1 to Ruapekapeka Pa site

·             $6,500,000

·             $6,000,500,000

·              

·             Provincial Growth Fund

·             As at 30 July 2020, The Provincial Growth Fund has announced $553.30 of funding for Northland.  Below is the snapshot of announced projects.

·              

·            

·              

·             6

·             Digital Engagement

·             Northland Inc

·             In progress

·             The project has been successful in achieving support from the US State Department through the Alumni Small Grants Committee, awarded the USD$10,000.00 for Connected Northland. Far North District Council will engage with Connected Nation, a US-based non-profit, to implement elements of their Digital Works program to promote remote work opportunities in our communities.

·              

·             The project partnership stems from a learning exchange coordinated through World Learning and sponsored through the U.S. State Department. The learning exchange took place in 2018 and 2019 involving a group from the South Pacific visiting the US to learn from various subject matter experts on broadband matters and conversely a group from the U.S. visiting New Zealand to learn about connectivity issues and opportunities in the Northland. The project offers a head start in the partnership development, learning exchange and visioning to advance the project goals.

·              

·             We have supported Ko Taitokerau Tatou; an IT/community development project that will support small local businesses, Mãori and community organisations with digital connection, online marketplace, and flax roots support.  This improves community connectedness and boosts small business viability (employability) post-COVID.  The project employs, trains, supports and provides business connection for 10 unemployed people. Funding decisions for this project is still in process.

·              

·             The PGF announced Tai Tokerau Fibre Networks Limited would receive $1.2M for Northland Digital Hubs.

·              

·             7

·             Regional ICT

·             FNDC

·             In Progress

·             The focus of this workstream is the Northland Transport Alliance, however the COVID-19 lockdown presented further collaboration opportunities.

·             The members Councils were informally supporting each other during the COVID-19 lockdown period. The move to working from home (WfH) has meant that a focus is now starting with cyber security and support our ‘new normal’.

·              

·             An initiative that has been started from KDC regarding a wider cyber security framework that will start in late August. This initiative will culminate several activities that will certainly allow for council to protect the new working from home environment as well as the wider cyber security threats that now exists with staff working remotely. 

·              

·             8

·             Solid Waste / Recycling

·             WDC

·             In Progress

·             Key priorities are: Agility to on-going changes to the re-cycling market and government policy/reforms.

·              

·             An update was provided to the Mayoral Forum, 25 May 2020.  The ongoing changes in the market and central government policy related to solid waste and recycling requires that the TAs in the region keep a ‘watching brief’ on progress nationally to see where the opportunities and risks emerge.

·              

·             The discussion at the Mayoral Forum, suggested that in order to enable more collaboration across Northland, there would need to be some alignment of policy, regulation, services and funding across the region. Services and funding are likely to see changes through the long- term plan and Waste Management and Minimisation Plan processes in each district.

·              

·             Potential regional collaboration projects that may be able to be implemented more quickly include waste data capture and/or public education campaigns.

·              

·             The Mayoral Forum acknowledged that this was not one of the highest priorities at present and the best way forward was to keep a watching brief and for Councils to be prepared to respond to quickly if required.  In conclusion the CEs are tasked with establishing a working group across Councils to look at best practice and develop a way forward.

·              

·             The National Waste Strategy is due from government in 2022, in the meantime Councils could progress sharing information, and consider the standardisation of user charges and existing policy.

·              

·              

·              

·              

·              

·             Strategy Workstreams

·             9

·             Regional Economic Development Strategy

·             NRC

·              

·             The development of this strategy will now require further consideration due to WDC’s decision not to participate in the proposed regional joint CCO for Northland and re-organisation of Northland Inc.  The work to develop a regional economic development strategy will be scoped in the first instance and the level of interest and participation from Northland Councils’ sought.

·              

·             10

·             Regional Accessibility Strategy

·             WDC

·             In Progress

·             The scope for the Regional Accessibility Strategy will cover all aspects of Council business; from operations, facilities and services to consider accessibility needs for all and to develop effective accessibility practice that meets the needs of the community.  Funding of $95K split between KDC 10%, FNDC 45% and WDC 45% is required to assist in the development of the strategy and further funding will be required for the 2021/2031 Long Term Plan to enable the implementation of the strategy.

·              

a.   Stage One – Information gathering analysis and discussion pack development

b.   Stage Two – Community Engagement

c.   Stage Three – Draft strategy development and finalise document

·          



Corporate

 

Transformation and Assurance

 

Audit and Assurance

 

From a very talented pool of applicants, we have been able to recruit someone exceptionally well qualified and able. One audit has been initiated this reporting period relating to vehicle fleet management. This review is timely to ensure practices for vehicle fleet management are suitable as we transition to a new operating rhythm that includes remote working.

 

Internal Audit progress included:

 

·    LGOIMA Compliance and Practice Report - The Proactive Release Policy has been completed and has started to be implemented.

·    Legislative Compliance System - Stakeholder interviews have been completed. A range of possible solutions have been investigated. Preliminary discussions about entering into a consortium with other councils to procure a legislative compliance system has begun.

 

 

Risk

 

Regular reporting, to the Assurance, Risk and Finance Committee, on the top organisational risks and their treatment plans continues.

 

Four risk progress reports with treatment plans are being prepared for a meeting of the Assurance, Risk, and Finance Committee in September. The updates are for ARF001 Climate Change Risk, ARF004 Asset Management Risk, ARF011 Organisational Cohesion Risk, and ARF013 Drinking Water Resilience Risk.

 

We have also commenced a risk assessment process for the Government funded capital works to support economic recovery and stimulate employment growth. This work will be reported to the Assurance, Risk, and Finance Committee in October.

 

 

Transformation

 

Work continues to re-orientate the Council’s transformation programme to support the delivery of a transformative crisis recovery plan. We are developing a new prioritisation and reporting framework for the internal Customer and Digital Transformation Programme Board. 

 

We completed the ‘Proof of Concept’ phase for the Creating and Enabling Great Workplaces initiative. An evaluation found that there were sufficient productivity and wellbeing gains from remote working to include it as part of our ongoing operating rhythm. The project now moves into a ‘test and learn’ phase which will confirm the organisation’s future office space requirements. We will also consult with staff on a new remote working policy to support the new operating rhythm.

 

The Creating and Enabling Great Workplaces Initiative is a demonstration of FNDC as a truly progressive council. It is pushing at the boundaries of exploring new ways of working – exactly what leading edge private sector companies are doing. In this regard, FNDC is very much a leader and not a follower seeking to create a win-win situation in a range of ways – offering more flexibility for employees, fast tracking online services for customers, improving environmental impacts and, over time assisting with cost reduction.

 

Social Procurement

 

The Manager – District Administration has been temporarily seconded into this role. The secondment has been extended until the end of the calendar year. Elected Members and SLT have expressed satisfaction at the significant progress made in developing policies and procedures. An Elected Member workshop was held and Members expressed support for further work, this being given a particular importance with shovel ready and other Crown funded schemes about to be launched.

 

 

Big Ideas Labs

 

Any organisation which seeks to label itself as progressive needs to be innovative. The first Big Ideas Lab produced a total of 19 ideas generated by Members. The second Big Ideas Lab was postponed because of a Ministerial visit and is scheduled for September. Two Elected Member proposals will be discussed in a ‘dragon’s den’ type format. As well as generating our own ideas, the Lab seeks to act as a focal point to showcase best practice from organisations across New Zealand and further afield.

 

 

CouncilMARK™

 

Corporate Services take the lead role in coordinating the CouncilMARK™ initiative (although there are significant contributions from all parts of the Council). FNDC were invited to be the subject of a Case Study as to how CouncilMARK™ can improve performance – the field work for this was carried out by an independent consultant recently and it went extremely well. Since then we have seen the draft final report and it makes for very positive reading – putting the Council in a strong position in the run up to our CouncilMARK™ assessment for 3-5 November.

 

The CouncilMARK™ team submitted all our documentation to the assessors who were due to be with us in September. However, because of the revised alert levels changing the review will now take place in November. We look forward to our assessment and are confident that the progress which the Council has made since the last assessment will be reflected in the score which we are awarded.

 


 

Digital Information Services

 

Executive Summary

 

The period has seen the continuation and ongoing work progressing across the team on a number of key projects and activities. COVID-19 alert level changes have meant that staff have continued in a Working from Home environment. The new support/operating model is being developed that align with the future operating rhythm as part of the Creating and Enabling Great Workplaces.

 

Several strategy planning sessions have been undertaken to ensure the Digital Information Services teams are aligned to the outcomes anticipated with the 2021/2031 LTP. Key importance will be the alignment of project budgets and outcomes for the initial 3-year period.

 

Recruitment has been completed with the ICT Operation and Delivery being at full complement at the end of October, this will be welcome relief as it will allow more improvements being completed as part of the new support model.

 

Council has also been made a finalist in the ALGIM (Association of Local Government Information Managers) COVID-19 Special Award.

 

Northland Digital Collaboration Alliance: The ICT teams from the four Northland Councils have joined together to form the ‘Northland Digital Collaboration Alliance’. This alliance is initially focusing on cybersecurity knowledge sharing and collaboration, but it is envisaged the alliance will grow to include other areas of interest in the future. This is a ‘reboot’ of the previous Northland Forward Together (ICT Collaboration Group). Terms of Reference and oversight of this will be developed in the coming quarter.

 

 

ICT Operations and Delivery

 

ICT Service Desk Requests: The number of ICT Service Desk requests received during the July-August period was 2,831. This number is slightly down from 3,132 which were received in the May-June period. After a concerted effort from the team, the number of outstanding requests has reduced from 550 down to 298.

 

ALGIM Local Government Cybersecurity Programme: FNDC have signed up to a Cybersecurity Programme defined by ALGIM and in conjunction with SAM for Compliance Ltd, to implement a pragmatic Cybersecurity Framework specific to New Zealand local government which is based on the Centre for Internet Security (CIS) 20 Controls. The first step in implementing the Cybersecurity Framework is to undertake an audit which will be completed by SAM for Compliance Ltd on 7 and 8 October. The outputs of this audit will feed into the design of an overall ICT Security Framework. This framework is a series of policies, procedures and processes that lower risk and vulnerability, and increase confidence in an ever-connected world. Safe, secure and functional information systems are vital for the successful operations of our Council.

 

IT Service Management (ITSM) Software System: Work is currently underway to review the existing IT Service Management software system (ServiceDesk Plus) to ensure it is the best possible solution for the team. Vendors from seven ITSM systems, including the incumbent, have presented demonstrations of their systems to the team. The next step is to finalise a shortlist based on our requirements and cost benefit analysis.

 

Digital Enablement Workshops: Staff have been running a series of digital enablement workshops with teams from throughout the Council that look at our new ways of working, collaborating with others, and getting the best out of tools such as Office 365, Teams and One Drive.

 

Smart Way 2 Reservation Booking System: The desk and room booking system continues to be further developed. 20 meeting rooms and collaboration spaces, and 71 desk spaces have now been set up. Final configuration is underway to set up an approvals process for booking the Council Chambers and Committee Room.

 

Recruitment: The two vacancies in the ICT Operations and Delivery Team have now been filled and the new staff members will be joining the team as ICT Support Specialists in early October.

 

 

Data Insights and Programme Delivery

 

Information Management (IM)

 

Property File ePathway Applications:  

·    July – 297

·    August – 306

 

Objective Support:

·    Help/fix requests resolved: 365

·    Files and folders created and approved: 74

·    Objective users’ changes/movements:  32

·    New User setup/staff movements:  16

 

Objective rubbish bin workflow: We now have a workflow for staff to use to dispose of unnecessary documents within Objective which automatically shifts them to the rubbish bin, which was formerly a manual process. 

 

 

Programme Delivery

 

Registrations: The registrations functionality in Pathway provides the foundation for expanded service delivery and access to a larger set of data particular to the user is under development. This is ready for an internal staff pilot where people can view their licensing data.

 

Upgrades Programme: Pathway: The forthcoming major release upgrade of Pathway - Pathway UX is underway. The UX environment has been built and licensed. This environment will serve as the basis for development and testing of the system. The rates capital Pathway environment has been successfully upgraded. Objective: Objective upgrade is now scheduled for the weekend of the 25 of September. TechOne: TechOne Core product was successfully upgraded on August 20 which will allow the continued updates for the Financial and Human Resources modules.

 

Online Services:

·    e-LIM applications are now available online to the public as of 20 August with positive feedback from the internal team and good customer uptake.

·    The My FNDC portal went live to the public on 31 July. This allows the public to lodge a request for service online including via mobile devices. 

·    The public can now pay their infringements online through the FNDC website. This was made available on 24 July.

·    The Paperclip functionality in Pathway that allows users to attach files more securely and integrates with Objective went live in July.  

·    The functionality that provides the ability for the public to access licensing information including building warrants of fitness, food & liquor, pool and health & bylaw has been completed and its release will be imminent. 

·    Resource Consent and engineering mobile inspections pilot has been successful and training to final staff has been scheduled. 

·    District Services mobile RFS and swimming pool pilots has been successful.

·    The Vision 2020 workflow milestone has been successfully completed and accepted by the business and is ready for go live the week beginning 7 September.

·    The Vision 2020 online resource consent applications are on target to launch on 1 October.

·    The building consent workflow and online forms have been successfully tested. This will improve our compliance statistics in time for the IANZ audit in October.

 

Business Intelligence & G.I.S.

 

Rates / Rating Information Database (RID) / Rate Review RID: Deploying the new RID environment reduced the size from 500GB to 3GB saving 480GB space. We have also cleaned out the RID of all unnecessary information making it faster and more secure and removing sensitive data from the RID. The RID data is more up to date because of the automated update scripts that will update the RID now on a monthly basis, previously the RID was only refreshed once or twice a year. A new Rates Review RID was deployed for the rating review. This will allow customers to compare their rates under the current system with the proposed move to the capital value based rated.  

 

Rates Arrears: We deployed Rates Arrears Process Stage 2 (formerly mortgage demand). This provides a full overview of rates and water arrears. This includes a matrix that determines whether an account is still subject to mortgage demand. Tracks changes in mortgage, arrears status, payment arrangements, status in relation to the mortgage demand process. Looks wider than just activity codes e.g. rate assessment X has an outstanding RFS for a direct debit which will affects what collection action may be taken.

 

A historic report lets data management team track a specific assessment through its collection journey or all changes that occurred on a specific day. When we receive the monthly LINZ updates it identifies where titles are missing from Pathway and notifies the Property Team. It also detects where a mortgage has been discharged or the mortgagee has changed since the last update and notifies DMT.

 

Quotable Value (QV): Automated monthly data extracts to QV (BC and CCC). Due to the business process an application would sometimes be missing from the report, the new report always tracks what’s been sent so nothing gets missed. The improved data supplied to QV ensures that the valuations are more accurate and up to date. This is especially important considering the Rate Review which proposes a shift to capital value-based rates (capital value = land value + improvement value). We created the new extract so the rates team could time their valuation inspection more efficiently (as soon as final inspection has occurred).

 

 

Key Analysis Projects

 

Rates Audit: Configured rate account information in an audit report supporting the rates team to ensure correct rate types are allocated across all rate accounts in accordance with policies and legislation.

 

Reporting entity hierarchy development: Designing the data warehouse architecture to deliver capability and flexibility to analyse data for business users, gathering requirements by working through data concepts and properties and defining the relationships that link them.

 

Asset Management System (AMS) Support: Data stream was created for wastewater and water meter data to GIS for better water and property analysis and for assisting with the upgrade to the new electronic network model of our Paihia water supply network. 

 

GIS Conference: The GIS Data team attended the ESRI/GIS online conferences to keep FNDC on the cutting edge of GIS technologies and to bringing us up to speed with the latest trend in GIS environments in local and national government.

 

ISO PLAN: ISOPlan/GIS integration for District Plan launch of new "ePlan" – the soft launch is mid-September and it will bring great value to district services with real time online data stream.

 

Far North Maps replacement: The development of the new Far North Maps for the replacement of current public facing maps has reached its final stages. FNDC has secured the services of Eagle to enable us to fast track our GIS road map and provide GIS services outside the FNDC network enabling 3rd party GIS players to integrate with the FNDC GIS portal. The benefits to FNDC are data being updated more regularly and not managed by a third party (money saving and faster GIS services delivery). Preparation has started for the Reserves, Parks data audit for Elected Members and FNDC staff. 

 

XMAP: X-Map inhouse replacement for E-Map has reached it final stages and adoption within FNDC has been phenomenal. The e-map replacement will save the Council $24 000 per year and all data and layers in the application are updated by FNDC with relevant layers and information to assist staff with more accurate data that is synced through the live system.

 

Programme Darwin: We have assisted Programme Darwin in creating a template to extract data from the current AMS system into to new IPS system.

 

SQL Infrastructure: SQL Server uptime in the last 6 weeks was 99.80% for the whole of the SQL Server environment. We didn’t have any failures outside scheduled maintenance. Over 8425 backup jobs executed successfully with zero failures because of the new updated platform we have deployed. We are ahead of schedule with the consolidation of all our SQL Servers to the new platform and this should be done by end Q3 instead of Q4 as previously mentioned. 

 


 

Operational Financial Performance

As at 31 August 2020


 

Variance Commentary

 

Operational Income

 

1.   Fees & charges is over budget

-      Kaitaia invoiced for water billing.

-      Ferry ticket sales with increased local tourists

 

2.   Other income is over budget

Provincial Growth funding (PGF) received for road sealing projects at Ruapekapeka, Ngapipito and Peria Road

 

Capital Income

 

3.   Central Government Subsidies is over budget

-      Unbudgeted footpath project subsidy from last year from NZTA at North Park Drive, Kaitaia

-      Unbudgeted Tourism Infrastructure Funds (TIF) funding received for construction of public toilets at Opononi, Mitimiti, Waitangi Boat Ramp and Haruru Falls Bush Walk

 

Operating Expenditure

 

4.   General Expenses is under budget

This is largely due to insurance which are not due for renewal yet

 

5.   Contractor and Professional Fees is over budget

July flood funding applied for and awaiting confirmation from NZTA

 

Capital Works

 

6.   District Facilities is over budget

Ongoing unbudgeted Tourism Infrastructure Funds (TIF) project for construction of public toilets at Opononi, Mitimiti, Waitangi Boat Ramp and Haruru Falls Bush Walk

 

7.   Stormwater is over budget

Ongoing renewals work at the Kawakawa Hundertwasser Memorial Park stormwater realignment project

 

8.   Water Supply is under budget

Kaitaia New Source (Sweetwater) project is currently in request for tender stage

 

9.   Governance & Strategic Administration is over budget

Ongoing projects from last year for Asset Management System, IT Compliance Field Mobility, Online Services, CiAnywhere and Computer Upgrades

Operations

 

Customer Service Statistics

 

Customer Satisfaction Results

 

All areas continue to perform well. The Libraries result has declined with feedback focused on issues around online access.

 

 

Responses (Month)

2020 YE Goal

Aug CSI

Trend

July CSI

% Change

Comments

Visitor Experience

180

99

98.9

98.5

0.4%

Consistently great results

Library Services

90

94

91.0

91.7

-0.8%

Slight decline as customers get used to new Library system

Community and Customer Service RFS

8

94

99.0

98.3

0.7%

Continued high levels of positive feedback.

 

 

Contact Centre / Service Centres

·    19.35% decrease in financial counter stats for Service Centres (6,838 down from 8,479)

·    31.90% increase in visitors to Service Centres (12,453 up from 9,441)

·    3.72% decrease in calls to the Contact Centre (16,055 down from 16,675)

·    11.50% increase in AskUs emails (3,975 up from 3,565)

·    9.09% decrease in Building Inspection bookings (900 down from 990)

 

i-SITEs

·    8% decrease in visitor numbers (25,616 down from 27,914) 

·    21% increase in retail revenue $12,810 up from $10,549)

·    17% decrease in transaction spend ($18,500 down from $22,505)

·    4% decrease in transaction numbers ($5,275 down from $5,534)

 

Libraries

·    12.4% decrease in eBook and audiobook downloads (6,795 down from 7,757), reflecting less eBook use post-lockdown

·    46.96% increase in library website sessions (150,198 up from 102,105) reflecting increased customer familiarity with the new system

 

Regulatory Services

 

Environmental Services

 

A total of 1,764 Requests for Service were received and 1,786 were closed during July - August 2020. This is over 500 more RFSs received than the previous two months however 320 of these were associated with dog registration queries. The dog registration renewal period ran from 1 July 2020 to 1 September 2020.

 

Animal Management

 

The Animal Management team received a total of 885 Requests for Service during July – August. The increase of 317 RFS’ compared to the previous period is relative to the dog registration queries received actioned by the Administration team. 98% of RFS’ were responded to on time.

 

The number of field base RFS’ received for this team has remained steady for this period at 565 compared with 552 for May-June. 102 of these RFS were for Priority 1 response.

 

The annual dog registration renewal period ran from 1 July 2020 to 1 September 2020. Out of a total of 11,081 known active dogs in the district, over 6,500 dogs are now currently registered for the 2020/2021 registration period. This figure is made up of renewed registration and new dog registrations. The team will now initiate a proactive registration follow-up program, to determine the status of dogs showing as unregistered on the system.

 

83 dogs were impounded across the District during the July and August period with five dogs rehomed through the Council’s website and six dogs transferred to the Bay of Islands Animal Rescue for re-homing.

 

A total of four infringements were issued to dog owners for offences during July-August.

 

The design and build work for both northern and southern shelter projects have been delayed due to the COVID-19 lockdown periods and budget shortfalls.

 

Council has recently been awarded $1 million for animal shelter projects through a successful bid for funding from the Provincial Development Unit (PDU) as part of the shovel-ready projects. The replacement Animal Shelter in Kaitaia is now ready to be constructed and a contract awarded. The additional funding received from the PDU provides an opportunity to explore further options for the Southern Shelter.

 

Environmental Health and Monitoring Compliance

 

There were 96 verifications scheduled and completed during July and August 2020. This is over 30 more verifications than the previous period due to the food verifications only resuming on 26 May 2020 due to the lockdown period.

 

During July-August there were 31 proactive alcohol license good host visits conducted. The EHO are conducting Good Host Visits concurrently when they carry out a food verification. A dedicated Technical Officer joined the team on 10 August 2020 and is currently undergoing training. As a result, this number is expected to increase and confident we will exceed our KPI target of 95% Good Host Visit inspections in the financial period.

 

A total of 181 noise complaints were received in the July-August period, an increase of nearly 20 from the previous period. 76% of these were responded to on time.

 

There were 92 Parking Infringements issued during July-August, with a total $ value of $2,740. As parking enforcement did not resume after lock-down until 2 June 2020, this is more than double the number of infringements issued during the last reporting period.

 

Swimming Pools

·    90 swimming pools inspections were carried out during the months of July and August, as Council returned to post COVID-19 routines

·    The swimming pool fail rate was disappointingly 50% for this period